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PikesPeakCourier.net

T E L L E R C O U N T Y, C O L O R A D OA publication of

January 14, 2015VOLUME 54 | ISSUE 2 | 7 5 ¢

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PIKES PEAK COURIER(USPS 654-460)

OFFICE: 1200 E. Highway 24Woodland Park, CO 80863

PHONE: 719-687-3006

A legal newspaper of general circulation in Teller County, Colorado, the Pikes Peak Courier is published weekly on Wednesday by Colorado Community Media, 1200 E. Highway 24, Woodland Park, CO 80863. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT WOODLAND PARK, COLORADO and additional mailing o� ces.

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Sanctuary set to expand parking, auditorium PUD/PBD amendment makes it through WP Planning Commission By Norma Engelberg Contributing writer

The original plans for The Sanctuary, the Charis Bible Col-lege’s Woodland Park campus, called for a number of parking lots scattered around its main buildings. Instead Andrew Wom-mack Ministries Inc. will consoli-date most of the surface parking into a fi ve-level parking garage.

Wommack Ministries’ repre-sentatives presented the parking garage proposal and plans to ex-pand the proposed auditorium to the Woodland Park Planning Commission on Jan. 8. Because The Sanctuary is a planned unit development/planned business development, amendments such as these proposed for Phase 2 construction must be approved by the planning commission. Usually planning-commission decisions are ratifi ed by city council but not in cases such as this.

Because he serves on the Ram-part Library District Board of Di-rectors and Andrew Wommack Ministries supports the district

monetarily, Commissioner Phil Mella announced that he would not be participating. The remain-ing commissioners approved the amendments unanimously. The new parking facility and the ex-isting surface parking areas will have spaces for 1,083 vehicles and The Sanctuary’s new audito-rium will have 3,185 seats instead of 2,500 seats.

Woodland Park Planning Di-rector Sally Riley said Wommack Ministries originally based its parking plan on 2,500 students but now is planning to eventually enroll 3,000 students. Using the city’s parking formula, one space for fi ve students, the required number of parking spaces would jump from 505 to 605.

Wommack Ministries is pro-posing to provide 1,440 spaces or one space for every 2.1 students. These additional spaces will not only provide spaces for students but also spaces for people attend-ing various conferences when students are on campus.

Kyle Campbell, from Classic Consulting, Engineers & Survey-ors, said the additional seats in the auditorium will have a negli-gible effect on the size of the au-ditorium and the parking garage will cover about the same area as the single surface lot that was originally approved in 2012.

Planning Commissioners were concerned about a letter from Northeast Teller County Fire Pro-tection District stating that the district wouldn’t sign-off on the expansion. This refusal was not based on whether the plan meets fi re protection standards but on the department’s concerns that it wouldn’t have enough resources to protect such a large facility.

Since the letter was written on Dec. 30, Brett Prather, of Archi-tectural Innovations LLC, said he has worked with the department to decrease its concerns. The buildings will be fully “sprinkled” and there will be additional fi re hydrants around the facility, bet-ter emergency access and “wet” stand pipes that would mean if there were a fi re the department would have more water available.

When asked if The Sanctuary might create its own emergency-services department, Prather said, “What fi re departments re-ally want is for civilians to get out of the way quickly so they can do their jobs. We already conduct regular fi re drills and we’ll con-duct evacuation drills in the new facility.”

There were also concerns about headlights shining into the Westwood Lakes neighborhood when the parking garage is used at night. Campbell said Wom-mack Ministries will alleviate the problem using a combination of landscaping and construction design.

One of those concerned was Westwood-Lakes neighbor Steve Roshek, who said, “They’ve been very good neighbors; I just want-ed a little clarifi cation.”

Roshek also asked when stu-dent housing might be built. Larry Bozman, who oversees Wommack Ministries’ construc-tion projects, said construction of student housing, in partnership with a for-profi t, commercial fi rm so that it will generate tax rev-enue, is still planned but Wom-mack Ministries’ attorneys want to make sure such a partnership won’t jeopardize the organiza-

tion’s nonprofi t status.“We’re watching develop-

ments in the fi eld,” he said. “It may take a few years but I’m con-fi dent it will happen.”

Another neighbor, Jim Hitt, asked about traffi c that piles up at the Trout Creek/U.S. 24 intersec-tion. He said sometimes he has to wait through three or four cycles of the light before he can through the intersection.

Wommack’s traffi c consultant Jeff Hodsdon, of LSC Transporta-tion Consultants Inc., suggested that the Colorado Department of Transportation, which controls signal lights on U.S. 24, hasn’t al-lowed enough “side-street green time.”

Riley said the city is working with the state on a pilot program that would allow Public Works Di-rector William Alspach to moni-tor and adjust signals through the city.

She also announced that this was the last meeting for City

Planner Lisa Parnell. Parnell, who is from Nebraska, has taken a job in Creighton, Neb., where she will

be administrator, clerk and trea-surer. Woodland Park is advertis-ing for a new planner.

Construction has started on Phase 2 of the Sanctuary, Charis Bible College, project. This is what neighbors living in parts of Westwood Lakes see. At left, tucked behind the Phase 1 buildings, is the foundation for an auditorium that will seat 3,185 visitors if the Woodland Park City Council approves an amendment allowing Andrew Wommack Ministries Inc. to expand its original plans. The expansion plan also includes a � ve-level parking garage. Photos by Norma Engelberg

People living in some parts of Westwood Lakes don’t see Charis Bible College, while other neighbors have a close-up view. Andrew Wommack Ministries Inc., which owns Bible colleges around the world, is requesting permission to amend The Sanctuary’s original plans for Phase 2, adding more seats to the auditorium and a � ve-level parking garage.

Phase 2 construction at The Sanctuary, the Woodland Park campus of Charis Bible College is clearly visible from the Phase 1 building’s porte-cochere.

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Residents of Teller County: Register now for CodeRED to be notified of severe weather or emergency situations.The CodeRED system will be used to notify residents of emergencies such as:Severe Weather - severe weather warning notifications will be issued within seconds after being issued by the National Weather Service. Weather notifications are issued for the immediate threats of severe thunderstorm warnings, flash flood warnings and tornado warnings.

Other emergencies and notifications may include:n Drinking water contamination n Utility outage n Missing person n Fires or floodsn Bomb threat n Hostage situation n Chemical spill or gas leak n Event road closure or delaysn Evacuation notice and route n Other emergency incidents where rapid and accurate notification is essential

It’s easy for you and your family members to stay informed - simply go to cripplecreekgov.com to register online by January 31st!

CODERED EMERGENCY NOTIFICATION SYSTEM

January begins with fatal accidentSta� report

The Colorado State Patrol is investigat-ing a two-vehicle crash that occurred at the intersection of Colorado 24 and Teller CR 81 near Cripple Creek in Teller County. The crash resulted in one fatality and three se-rious injuries.

A 2002 Lexus ES sedan was traveling southbound on Colorado 67 as a 2008 Kia Optima was traveling northbound. The Lexus attempted to negotiate a curve to the right when the driver encountered a

section of icy/snowpacked roadway and lost control of the vehicle, which began ro-tating clockwise. The driver attempted to regain control of the vehicle by steering to the left, which caused the Lexus to rotate counter-clockwise.

The Lexus departed the southbound lane and entered the northbound lane into the path of the northbound Kia. The front of the Kia collided with the right side of the Lexus, sending the Lexus off the eastern edge of the roadway and down an embank-ment before the vehicle came to rest. After

impact, the Kia came to rest on its wheels on the roadway.

The driver of the Lexus, 38-year-old Shangbao Tang of Colorado Springs, was wearing his seatbelt and sustained minor injuries. A female passenger in the Lexus, identified as 38-year-old Quanling Guan of Colorado Springs, was wearing her seat-belt, but sustained serious injuries and was transported to a local hospital. A male pas-senger, a 30-year-old male from Colorado Springs, was not wearing his seatbelt and was killed in the crash. His name is being

withheld until his next-of-kinhave been notified.The Kia’s driver, 64-year-old David Ta-

foya of Colorado Springs, was wearing his seatbelt, but sustained serious injuries. Ta-foya’s passenger, 68-year-old Lillian Tafoya of Colorado Springs, was wearing her seat-belt, but suffered serious injuries. Both the Tafoyas were transported to a local hospi-tal for treatment.

At this time, alcohol and/or drug use is considered to be a factor in the crash, which remains under investigation.

CUSP to control burnsSta� report

Starting Jan. 7, Coalition for the Upper South Platte will be burning slash piles north of Divide near Ute Lakes Subdivi-sion. Smoke will be visible. For more infor-mation, contact CUSP at (719)748-0033.

Pico pleads guiltySta� report

Louis Pico, 67, of Green Mountain Falls, pleaded guilty Jan. 5 to promotion of obscenity to a minor in the 4th Ju-dicial District Court. Pico is accused of stalking a 10-year-old girl in Green Mountain Falls.

Pico was arrested Aug. 23 on suspicion of stalking, obscenity, in-decent exposure and public indecency.

Pico

EDITOR’S NOTE: Calendar submissions must be received by noon Wednesday for publication the following week. Send listings to [emailprotected]. No attachments, please. Listings are free and run on a space-available basis.

WOODLAND PARK, Cripple Creek, Divide, Florissant, Green Mountain Falls, Lake George, Victor

THROUGH MARCH 8

SPIN CLASSES Mountain Top Cycling Club will host 20 spin class sessions on Monday and Friday nights through Friday, March 8 at Woodland Park Middle School, in the commons area. Doors unlock at 5:40 p.m., with pedals turning at 6 p.m. A one-time fee of $25 will be charged, for building use and insurance. Participants must provide their own bikes and trainer equipment. David Kreigshauser will instruct the class in a 60- to 75-minute work out to his videos from Seek Out Cycling. Times and dates will be posted on the club website under the calendar tab as there will be some days there will not be class. Visit www.mountaintopcyclingclub.comor call Debbie 719-689-3435.

JAN. 17

WATER WORLD Dinosaur Resource Center, 201 S. Fairview St., Woodland Park, presents

Wild World of Water, from 1:30-2:30 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 17. Is it possible to hold water upside down? What makes an iceberg stay a�oat? Can some liquids �oat better than others? Learn about these subjects and more, with Cathy Kelsay from Fantasy Forest for a fun-�lled hour with storytelling and hands-on experiments. Go to www.rmdrc.com.

JAN. 17

HIKE PROGRAM Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument presents Hikes for Your Health at 10 a.m. Wednesdays and Saturdays through March 21. Hikes are led by park rangers and vary from 2 to 5 miles. Hikes may be either on foot or showshoe (can be borrowed if needed). Participants must be 10 years or older. The hike on Saturday, Jan. 17, is the Sawmill Trail, a 2.3 mile loop. Meet at the visitor center. Visit www.nps.gov/�fo or call 719-748-3253.

JAN. 17

JUPITER RISING Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument presents Jupiter Rising from 6-8 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 17. The King of the Planets is back. Jupiter is rising in the east, returning to the early evening sky. And it’s not alone: the small but dynamic Comet Lovejoy is close by and changing day by day. Follow in the historic footsteps of

Galileo, Halley, and Messier, as we discover Jupiter’s moons and the comet’s tail, explore the nightly movements of these objects, and compare them to some of the “comet impostors” that never move. Meet at the Visitor Center. Please dress for winter weather in Colorado. Bring binoculars or a �ashlight if you wish (red-�ltered lights only please). Call 719-748-3253 or visit www.nps.gov/�fo.

JAN. 17

ART WORKSHOP, exhibit A community art workshop to celebrate Martin Luther King Jr Day is from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 17. All ages welcome and materials provided. Join family, friends and the community to create inspired pieces of art celebrating the vision of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his dream for unity, peace and justice. We will work on several art pieces individually that will be joined together to create a powerful art exhibit to be shared with the community.What we make today will be assembled and displayed during the evening community art exhibit.Absolutely no “art talent” needed. Bring your heart, familyand friends,and have some fun. The art exhibit and big reveal is from 5-8 p.m. Bring your family and friends to view the completed projects. Come browse, take pictures with, discuss and enjoy the beauti-

ful work created by our community earlier but profoundly changed by uniting the pieces together to create larger art pieces. This exhibit brings the community’s art together to show “The Power of Unity.” Free event. Go to www.wpmlk.org for info.

JAN. 17

HOLISTIC HEALING A special holistic healing day event is planned from noon to 3:30 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 17, at Mountain View United Methodist Church, 1101 Rampart Range Road, Woodland Park. Practitioners from the Wholistic Networking Community provide services on a �rst-come �rst-served basis. Group healing is from noon to 1 p.m. Information available on the Wholistic Networking Community page on Facebook. Donations and non-perishable food items are requested. Contact Shari Bill-ger, 719-748-3412 or [emailprotected].

JAN. 20

WHOLISTIC WELLNESS The Wholistic Networking Community invites you to meet area practitioners and learn about wholistic wellness from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 20at the Rampart Public Library, 218 E. Midland Ave., Woodland Park. Speaker is WNC co-coordinator and international teacher/healer Shari Billger. In her workshop, “Human Design: The Bridge

YOUR WEEK & MORE

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PPRH greets New Year with ban on smoking By Pat Hill [emailprotected]

January 1 was a red-letter day at Pikes Peak Regional Hospital. From that day forward there is no smoking on the entire cam-pus, which includes land around the medical offi ce.

Granted, some people on staff are smokers. “We rolled it out last year, want-ed to give the staff plenty of opportunity to quit,” said Lisa Diamond, the hospi-tal’s chief nursing offi cer.

Saying no to smoking offers fi nancial benefi ts in addition to the cost of ciga-rettes, which averages $6 a pack.

“They get a break on their health insurance if they’re tobacco-free,” Dia-mond said.

The new rules are in-tended to put a halt to the image presented by smok-ers gathering outside on the hospital grounds to light up. “The visual is probably the biggest issue we’d like to resolve, as they stand right out front and smoke,” said Eric Riggle, marketing manager for PPRH.

The move toward imple-menting a tobacco-free campus is not entirely unexpected. “We felt we should be in line with other health-care facilities in the area which have been to-bacco-free for many years,” Diamond said. “We need to promote health.”

Admittedly, there was

some grumbling at fi rst. “We did have some resis-tance from individuals here on campus but they came to the committee meetings - and we converted them,” said Russ Koch, facilities director and safety man-ager.

As it turned out, the committee itself was a source of education for both sides. “One person on

our staff told me he was a `landmark’ smoker; I had never heard that term be-fore,” Koch said.

A landmark smoker is one who lights up between signs, or stop lights, for in-stance, on the way to a des-tination, work, for instance. Today, that staff member has relinquished the pull-out-a-cigarette stops and waits until evening to feed

the habit. “Now he is one of our big supporters on the committee,” Koch said.

Diamond emphasizes the soft-landing approach to the new policy. “We did not want this to be man-date or dictatorship kind of thing,” she said. “We want-ed buy-in. We are respect-ful of our employees and want them to understand why we’re doing it.”

All the way around, however, smoking is a negative when it comes to maintaining good health. For instance, studies have shown that second-hand smoke is harmful even when the smoker is not in the room.

“They found that nico-tine and carcinogens are still on their skin; and then, if they hold their children,

those carcinogens can be

transmitted through the

children’s skin,” Diamond

said. “And we didn’t want

that for our patients.”

Russ Koch, facilities director and safety o� cer for Pikes Peak Regional Hospital, and Lisa Diamond, Chief Nursing O� cer, tout the hospital’s new designation as a tobacco-free campus. Photo by Pat Hill

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for your enjoyment.

Hickenlooper seeks help for long-term unemployedInitiative aims to help those who have been without a job for at least 26 weeksBy Ivan MorenoAssociated Press

Gov. John Hickenlooper’s administra-tion wants to help people who have been unemployed at least 26 weeks find jobs with a $3 million initiative aimed at con-necting them with interested employers.

Hickenlooper on Jan. 8 announced the plan, which will utilize a new website to connect Colorado employers with workers. The $3 million comes from the federal gov-ernment, with the state kicking in $100,000 for the website.

The federal funding will go for job or interview training, counseling and intern-ships for the long-term unemployed.

According to the state Department of Labor and Employment, nearly 50,000 people in Colorado have been unemployed for at least 26 weeks, which is defined as long-term unemployment.

“It does change the way you go about your day. It changes how you relate with your family, your friends,” Hickenlooper. “It changes what you see in the mirror, some of the old confidence and things you took for granted isn’t the same.”

Overall, the job outlook for the state has improved. Colorado’s unemployment rate is 4.1 percent.

But state officials say there is a stigma associated with being out of work long term, presenting a challenge for job seek-ers. In some cases, the jobs that they once held no longer exist or they have been un-able to keep up with the skills they need in their field, said Ellen Golombek, the execu-

tive director of the state labor department.“Many of these long-term unemployed

are highly qualified. Their skills just don’t match the jobs that are currently open,” Golombek said.

Participating in the initiative is volun-

tary for employers. But state officials say they’ll have an incentive to hire workers who just need training to brush up on their skills.

“We have a pool of employers who are constantly willing to step up, sometimes

just because it’s the right thing to do,’’ said Fiona Arnold, the executive director of the Colorado Office of Economic Development and International Trade. “In this case, it’s because it’s not only the right thing to do, but they’re hurting for employees, too.”

A group picture of the South Metro Denver group outside of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. The goal of the chamber is to create jobs and workforce stability, hence the permanent sign, said Je� Wasden, President of the Colorado Business Roundtable. Courtesy photo

AREA CLUBSPOLITICAL

TELLER COUNTY Democratic Party (TellerDems)invites interested persons to at-tend its 2014 informational and educational programs, as well as community events. For details about the TellerDems calendar of activities, call Mrs. Ellen Haase, 719-687-1813.

TELLER COUNTY Republicans meets at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month at the Pikes Peak Comyomunity Center in Divide next to the Conoco. Come and help set the course for conservative thinking and direction in Teller County, Colorado, and the nation. Additional information at http://www.teller-gop.org.

TRANSPORTATION’S LOCAL Coordinating Council of Teller County meets at 9 a.m. on the third Monday of each month at the Aspen Mine Center in Cripple Creek. This meeting is open to the public and all are welcome to attend.

PROFESSIONAL

DIVIDE CHAMBER of Commerce. Contact president Lisa Lee at 719-686-7587 for meeting dates and times.

COMPUTER CLASSES. The Woodland Park Public Library o�ers computer basics, Internet basics, Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Digital Photo Management classes. Some classes have prerequisites, and registration is required for all. Call 719-687-9281, ext. 106 to register.

PIKES PEAK Workforce Center o�ers monthly classes on topics such as resume writ-ing, interview skills and more. Workshops are free and take place at the main o�ce, 1675 Garden of the Gods Road, Suite 1107, Colorado Springs. Call 719-667-3730 or go to www.ppwfc.org.

TELLER BUSINESS Builders meets at 7 a.m. Mondays at the Hungry Bear, 111 E.

Midland Ave., in Woodland Park. The group helps local businesses through coopera-tive marketing, professional education and trusted relationships. Call Gail Wingerd at 719-686-1076 or send e-mail to [emailprotected] or Mike Hazelwood at 719-473-5008

TELLER NETWORKING Team meet from 7:45-8:45 a.m. Thursdays at Denny’s Restaurant in Woodland Park. TNT is a local businesses owners networking group working to pass leads and help each others’ businesses grow. Join us to learn more or call Vickie at 719-748-1274.

RECREATION

ART CLASSES are o�ered year-round at Shanika Studio for ages 13 and older. Classes focus on traditional oil painting skills, but also include other artistic mediums including drawing, watercolor, acrylic and mixed media. Classes are two and a half hours and are o�ered Mondays, Thursdays or Saturdays. Days may change to meet students’ needs. Classes are taught by professional artist Kenneth Shanika. Contact 303-647-1085, [emailprotected] or www.ShanikaFineArts.com.

CHRISTIAN YOGA is o�ered at 5 p.m. and 6:45 p.m. Sundays at Corner Street, 500 E. Midland Ave. in Woodland Park. Mindfullness-centered practice aimed at relaxation, focus, gentle movement.Contact Chrissy Bensen, with bStill Integrative Wellness LLC at 719-510-2743 (www.bStillyoga.com) before attending for the �rst time to reserve a spot; after that, just drop in. Cost is $7 per class.

FLORISSANT GRANGE Hall is available for events including weddings, birthdays, anniversaries and memorials. The Florissant Grange Hall, also known as the Old School House in Florissant, is a historic building built in 1887 and 1888. School started in the school in 1889 and continued through 1960, which creates an interest-ing historic atmosphere. The Old School House sits on 2-plus acres and weather permitting the grounds can be used as well. Call 719-748-5004 and leave a message to arrange a time to visit the Grange Hall and reserve this space for your event.

EVERY THURSDAY all year the Florissant Grange Hall (The Old School House) is

Clubs continues on Page 5

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Knights to the rescue By Pat Hill [emailprotected]

Thanks to the Knights of Columbus at Our Lady of the Woods Catholic Church, children and families served by The Re-source Exchange received a little extra help last month.

The Knights launched their campaign Nov. 1, seeking donations in exchange for Tootsie Rolls candy for customers of Walmart in Woodland Park. “The response was unbelievable. Many folks didn’t even take candy; they just gave to the Children’s with Disabilities Charity,” Danny Keuhlen said. “The smiles, the small children put-ting change into the can, the friendly caring folks of Woodland Park and Teller County just tickled our hearts and bol-stered one’s faith in humanity.”

Within six hours that day in November, the Knights had raised $226. In a ceremony Jan. 6 at the church, the Knights presented the check to Joann Jones, the organiza-tion’s service coordinator for Teller County. Jones’ offi ce is in the Woodland Exchange building in Woodland Park.

For children with disabilities, the or-ganization provides occupational, speech and physical therapies, Jones said, adding that The Resource Exchange works with children who are diagnosed with Down syndrome, autism and cerebral palsy. “We can use the funds to help parents pay for gas cards, for instance, to bring their chil-dren to Colorado Springs for therapies,” Jones said.

Currently, The Resource Exchange has seven community-based offi ces through-out El Paso, Park and Teller counties. The organization serves people with devel-opmental disabilities in communities

throughout the region, with a mission to help families and build independence for people with developmental disabilities.

“They have had a profoundly positive impact on the community,” Keuhlen said.

The Tootsie Roll fundraiser is a nation-

wide event for the Knights of Columbus, a Catholic men’s fraternal service organiza-tion.

Joann Jones, coordinator for The Resource Exchange in Teller County, is happy to receive a check for $226 from Don Zaleski, Grand Knight of the Knights of Columbus Council 625, a fraternal men’s service organization at Our Lady of the Woods Catholic Church. Courtesy photo

open from 6-9 pm for the Jammers Music and Pot Luck. This is a happening place to be on Thursday evenings. Sometimes we have more musicians than people and sometimes we have more people than the hall can hold, but no matter what, we have fun and great music and fabulous food. All musicians are welcome to join in the jam session and if you are not a musi-cian, come for the social evening out. Call 719-748-0358.

YOGA AT Shining Mountain Studio with Nancy Stannard. Safe, fun and empowering; accessible to all � tness levels. Ongoing classes are 5:30 p.m. Wednesday (intermediate); 9 a.m. Thursday (gentle beginner); and 10 a.m. Saturday (intermediate). Contact Nancy at gentleyoga4healing.com before � rst class and see gentleyoga4healing.com for more information.

GET IN shape with a parks and recreation � tness member-ship. The center o� ers Paramount and Nautilus equipment and free weights. Schedule a personalized � tness orientation and have an individual workout program designed for your � tness needs. Individuals ages 16 and older are welcome to become � tness members. Minors require signed parental permission. Corporate memberships are available. Call 719-689-3514.

FRONT RANGE Fencing Club. Learn to fence class for children and adults. Meets at Discovery Canyon Campus. Visit http://frontrangefencing.tripod.com/ Advanced competitive lessons available too.

HEALTHIER LIVING Colorado, Diabetes Self-Management Workshop. Learn the skills needed to manage your diabe-

tes.Teller County Public Health and Community Partnership Family Resource Center o� er six-week classes to help you with the challenges of living with this ongoinghealth condi-tion.Participants learn how to control their blood glucose, prevent complications, and cope with the stress of having a chronic health condition. Call Teller County Public Health at 719-687-6416 or visit www.cpteller.org or www.co.teller.co.us/PublicHealth for information and a list of classes in your neighborhood.Suggested donation $35.

JAM NIGHT. The Grange Hall is open from 6-9 p.m. every Thursday for the Jammers music and potluck. This is a great night and the place to be on Thursdays. The music is always di� erent depending on who and how many musicians show up. We always have fun, good food and dancing. All musicians are welcome to join in the jam session. If you are not a musi-cian, come for a social evening out to meet other community members. Call 719-748-0358.

KARATE PLUS meets at 6 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays at Woodland Park Community Church and at 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays at Lake George Bible Church. The class includes Japanese karate and jujitsu, Okinawan weapons, padded sparring and Judo throws. Self-defense is also taught. The program is Bible-based. Black belt instruction. KP has been in the Ute Pass area for more than 16 years. Low rates. Ages 5 through adult. Two free lessons. For more information call Ken at 719-687-1436. KP is nonpro� t and non-denominational.

AREA CLUBSContinued from Page 4

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6 Pikes Peak Courier January 14, 2015

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SALES DEADLINE:JANUARY 30, 2015

PUBLICATION DATE:FEBRUARY 25, 2015

History

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Events & More

Seedling trees available until April 8For the Courier

The deadline to order low-cost seed-lings and shrubs from the Colorado State Forest Service Woodland Park District, which serves Teller, El Paso and Park coun-ties, is April 8.

The CSFS Trees for Conservation pro-gram allows landowners to obtain seedling trees and shrubs at a nominal cost to be used for conservation and land rehabilita-tion purposes. Seedlings can be used for reforestation, to establish windbreaks or snow fences, for use in erosion control, to enhance wildlife habitat and for other ap-plications.

“The CSFS hopes to help landown-ers make personal commitments to their properties by planting seedling trees. Planting seedlings is an excellent way to improve species diversity and become a

better steward of the land,” said Michael Till, forester with the CSFS Woodland Park District.

Till says that the species the CSFS of-fers have been selected specifically for the soil types and climatic factors present in the Pikes Peak region. Examples of tree and shrub species well-suited for El Paso, Teller and Park counties are native plum, chokecherry, aspen, Douglas-fir, piñon pine and ponderosa pine. The Woodland Park District also sells an assortment of seedling survival accessories, to aid in tree and shrub establishment.

Seedling orders made by April 8 will be available for pickup at the Woodland Park District office on May 2-3. For more information or to obtain an order form, go to csfs.colostate.edu, click on “Your Lo-cal District” and select the Woodland Park District, or call (719) 687-2921.

Heat is on for new yearFor the Tribune and Courier

The new year brought new problems for 329 Colorado drivers arrested for impaired driving over New Year’s Eve DUI enforce-ment, that ran between Dec. 30 and Jan. 5. In addition, preliminary reports from the Colorado Department of Transporta-tion (CDOT) indicate that there were 153 impaired driving fatalities in 2014 and 466 fatalities overall.

“Our goal is to reduce the number of both alcohol-related and non-alcohol-related traffic fatalities in 2015,” said Col. Scott Hernandez, Chief of the Colorado State Patrol. “Last year we increased im-paired driving arrests by over 23% and educated people about the risks of driving impaired. We will continue to do so this year.”

Seventy-three law enforcement agen-cies participated in the New Year’s cam-paign. Preliminary reports show that the highest DUI arrest totals came from Colo-rado State Patrol (50 arrests), Aurora Police Department (49 arrests), Denver Police (47 arrests) and Colorado Springs Police De-partment (32 arrests).

In 2014, 7,825 people were arrested for

impaired driving during the 12 The Heat is On enforcement periods – averaging ap-proximately 650 DUI arrests per enforce-ment period. The largest number of arrests occurred during the following enforce-ment periods: Fall Festival (1,854 arrests), Spring Events (1,806 arrests) and Labor Day (1,102 arrests).

“CDOT, CSP and local law enforcement work hand-in-hand year after year to re-duce the number of impaired drivers and traffic fatalities – especially those involving alcohol or drugs,” said Darrell Lingk, Direc-tor of the CDOT’s Office of Transportation Safety. “While we won’t be able to have zero fatalities in 2015, we will continue to strive for this goal each year.”

The Heat Is On campaign runs throughout the year with 12 specific high visibility impaired driving enforcement periods centered on national holidays and large public events. Enforcement pe-riods can include sobriety checkpoints, saturation patrols and additional law en-forcement on duty dedicated to impaired driving enforcement. More details about the campaign, including impaired driving enforcement plans, arrest totals and safety tips can be found at HeatIsOnColorado.com.

THE LAKE George Gem and Mineral Club Youth Program for Earth Science Education, Peblepups, meets from 6-6:45 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at the Lake George Com-munity Center on Hwy 24 on the east side of Lake George. The program is free to students age 8-18. Each session discusses a separate aspect of Earth science or mineral collecting. Warm weather will allow �eld trips on weekends. Further in-formation from Steve Veatch 719-748-5010 or John Rakowski 719-748-3861 or at LGGMClub.org.

THE LAKE George Gem and Mineral Club meets the second Saturday of every month at the Community Center, Lake George. Meetings begin at 10 a.m. until May, when it changes to 9 a.m. to accommodate a �eld trip in conjunction with the regular meeting. There is always a program or �eld trip.

MOTHER BEAR Self-Defense o�ers Krav Maga classes from 9-10:30 a.m. Saturdays and by appointment on Thursdays on the second �oor of the Corner Dance Studio in Woodland Park. Mother Bear also o�ers women’s self-defense classes for groups of three or more. Contact Wendy at 719-323-7949 for information.

THE MOUNTAIN Top Cycling club holds monthly meetings for bicyclist of all types and skill levels. The club meets at di�erent locations on the �rst Tuesday of the month. Member-ship fee is $25 for individual and $40 for family. We have guest speakers, presentations and door prizes. The meeting is from 7-8 p.m. Social time at 6:30 p.m. Visit www.mountaintop-cyclingclub.com or write us Mountain Top Cycling Club P.O.Box 843 Woodland Park CO 80866. For more information, call Debbie at 719-687-2489.

PIKES PEAK Plein Air Painters o�ers year-round artistic activities, painting on locations, social activities pertaining to the visual arts and art shows. The group is open to anyone in-terested in learning to paint or to improve their painting skills. Contact Kenneth Shanika at 303-647-1085 or [emailprotected], or go to www.PikesPeakPleinAirPainters.com

TAI CHI is o�ered for free at 9 a.m. Mondays at the Florissant Public Library. Call 719-748-3549 or Margaret McKinney, 719-748-5141

TAI CHI is o�ered every Wednesday at Florissant/Four Mile

Continued from Page 5

AREA CLUBS

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Pikes Peak Courier 7 January 14, 2015

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To reserve your ad space contactAnita Riggle | 719-686-6457 | [emailprotected]

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SALES DEADLINE:JANUARY 30, 2015

PUBLICATION DATE:FEBRUARY 25, 2015

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OPINIONY O U R S & O U R S

First � � y of the Courier and more The Ute Pass Courier announced the win-

ners of the Man of the Year Contest in the Jan. 7. 1965 edition of the paper.“We were rather dubious about anyone tak-ing it seriously,” wrote then publisher Agnes Schupp at the time. “Would any votes reach the Courier offi ce?”She answered in the next graph.“Yes, indeed! The Reverend Micheal Kav-enagh voted into fi rst place unanimously by a fl ood of votes. We asked for a ‘reason.’ Perhaps the best one found lying on the desk one noon;”“Us kids want Rev. Micheal Kavenagh to be The Man of the Year. We waited in your offi ce but you wasn’t here. We got to tell you why. Well — We like father Kavenagh because he is him.” Right behind Kavenagh, is Pete Brown for “going right ahead, not caring if people agree with him or not. He believes is progress and growth of this area and he wants everyone to prosper — not just himself,” the paper reasoned.Not far behind was Bert Bergstrom, of which it was noted “Bert has lent a helping hand whenever and wherever it is needed. Bert never cause much commotion — he is just a good guy.”The paper offer congratulation to these men but identifi ed a possible improvement in the project for coming years. “I still think there should have been a Woman of the Year — and our votes would have been cast for Mrs. Hunter Caroll.”Strangely, this was only Publisher Schupp’s fi rst year of year of running the Ute Pass Courier and she was willing to try new things. In fact, it was within the very fi rst year of

existence of the Ute Pass Courier. That’s right, the paper is now in its 50th year. We plan to mark that accordingly.The fi rst edition of the paper hit the streets on July 23, 1964.“A morally bankrupt publisher, who was printing the short-lived Woodland Park paper called the Eagle, skipped town with the subscription money from local residents after 10 issues,” according to later articles in the Courier.“Manfred (Monte ) and Agnes (Ag) Schupp saved the paper from scandal and early demise,” reported the Courier at the 25th anniversary of the publication. “About one month after he stole out of town, the Schupps put out their inaugural edition of 500 copies. Staff included Tom Bonifi eld, then owner of Woodland Pharmacy, and M.E. “Pete” Brown, who owned the Browncraft Steakhouse. He was later instrumental in establishing Langstaff-Brown Medical Center.”The paper was fi rst printed in La Junta and was taken there by bus and returned Thurs-day mornings for distribution.“The driving force behind the Courier, Agnes (also a mother and free-lance writer) often used her kitchen table as the production room for the paper,” the paper reported later.

“She suffered from a heart condition which was aggravated by the area’s high elevation, and during her failing health she sold half interest to Maureen Jones in the fall of 1965.”Agnes Schupp died of heart attack June 19, 1966, and Manfred and Jones sold full inter-est to Roy and Carol Lee Robinson Sept. 1, 1966. Publisher, editor and reporter for 12 years, Roy Robinson received many honors and awards from Colorado Press Association for the paper’s overall progress. During his tenure, the Courier was published in Cripple Creek along with Cripple Creek Times, then owned by his father, B.G. Robinson.The paper, later published by notable main-stays of Woodland Park, Gene and Carol Sper-ry, and others, (a complete linage will follow in coming editions as we gear up to celebrate over 50 years of serving Teller County and the Ute Pass region). The publication has many locations over the years, fi nally residing in the building it is in now, since 1984.The Courier became the Pikes Peak Courier View as the Cripple Creek Gold Rush was merged with it in 2007, and recently View was dropped to refl ect its longtime roots. The Gold Rush (with ancestors of the Times, Record, Citizen, and others) traced it roots all the way back to Cripple Creek Crusher, born Dec. 4, 1891, of which this year marks 124 years. To most locally, we have always been the Courier.Look for details of our fi rst 50 years of history here on the fl anks of Pikes Peak, and the businesses, sources, readers, advertisers, and friends who helped make it possible in coming editions. And we will offer clues on where we are going for our next 200 years. Yes, indeed!

Bill, Elvis and me in summer of 1988 In the summer of 1988, I went on a three-

week vacation with my buddy Bill Mahoney. The main purpose of our trip was to see as many different baseball games in as many different cities as possible. We also wanted to tour America’s historical landmarks.

But little did Bill or I know that Elvis Pres-ley - and cows - would become central parts of our sojourn around the country.

We began our trip from southern Califor-nia in late July. Earlier that summer a report surfaced from Kalamazoo, Michigan, that El-vis had been spotted eating at a Burger King in the town. It was interesting news, to say the least, considering Elvis was said to have died Aug. 16, 1977, at the age of 42 at his Memphis, Tennessee, home. Apparently, Elvis had not left the building.

The downtown Burger King in Kalamazoo attracted international attention after a story in the Kalamazoo Gazette identifi ed it as one of two places that a local woman and her daughter claimed to have seen the late “King

of Rock and Roll.”Former Kalamazoo Gazette reporter Tom

Haroldson interviewed Louise Welling, who said she had also seen Elvis at the Felpausch supermarket in nearby Vicksburg, and that her daughter had seen Elvis at the Burger King in Kalamazoo.

Old Tiger Stadium in Detroit was on our list of ballparks to visit. Bill and I looked at a map before our departure and discovered that at one point during our trip we would be near Kalamazoo. If time allowed, we would

dine at the same Burger King Elvis had been spotted.

It sounds kind of wild to think about now, but the “Elvis is alive” craze during the summer of 1988 really did catch much of the nation by storm. Elvis was spotted in all sorts of places by seemingly normal people with no agenda and no motive for making up crazy stories.

There was no internet in 1988 and very few people had hand-held cell phones or car phones. Radio, television, newspapers and magazines were still the best ways of getting news. Since Bill and I were driving coast to coast - and north and south - we relied on the radio for most of our information. We caught television news reports in the evenings when we settled in a new town for the night.

The fi rst big city we hit was Las Vegas, where Elvis was a legend in the 1970s. Oddly, there was no talk of him being spotted in Las

Summers continues on Page 9

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New Congress is chance for change Washington is traditionally mired in

gridlock and political games. And it’s no secret that despite some victories for Colorado, the last Congress was the least productive in modern history. Now, as the new year ushers in a new Congress, there is renewed potential for compromise and collaboration. If Washington can move past the partisanship, there is plenty we can accomplish.

Our offi ce is working with Republi-cans and Democrats on a host of issues important to Coloradans that will make government more effi cient, effective and accountable.

With tightening budgets and unreliable federal support, local governments across the state are looking for innovative ways to fi nance infrastructure projects. These projects are critical to our local communi-ties and our economy. The American So-ciety of Civil Engineers scored Colorado’s infrastructure at a C-plus and rated the nation a D-plus.

We’ve teamed up with Sen. Roy Blunt, a Republican from Missouri, to help. Our bill, the Partnership to Build America Act, without spending federal dollars,

would create an infrastructure bank to help communities maintain or build new roads, highways, bridges, schools, water conduits, tunnels and other projects. It’d be funded through bonds U.S. companies would purchase in exchange for allowing them to exclude a certain portion of their overseas earnings from taxation. This bill could help put people back to work on projects important to Coloradans like the expansion of public transit in the Denver metro area or building the Arkansas Valley Conduit.

We are working with Tennessee Re-publican Sen. Lamar Alexander on a bill to simplify the process for applying for college fi nancial aid. Countless college

students and their families have suffered through the 10-page, 108-question FAFSA form. We’re proposing a plan to reduce the current form to two questions. This dramatically streamlined form would encourage more students to apply for aid and allow more students to access higher education.

We’ve met with and heard from stu-dents, parents, high school and college administrators and fi nancial-aid advisers across the state to discuss the challenges of the current form. From Pueblo Commu-nity College to Front Range Community College to Metropolitan State University, there is a resounding and overwhelming desire for a more effi cient process. At a time when other countries are making it easier to attend college, our priority should be ensuring that higher education is as accessible as possible to as many stu-dents as possible. This bill will save fami-lies across the nation millions of hours so they can focus on preparing their kids for success in higher education.

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Vegas, which Bill and I thought was some-what ironic.

No sooner did we leave Las Vegas and head north on Interstate 15 when news reports of Elvis sightings began occurring everywhere around the country. People claimed to see him at grocery stores, 7-Elev-ens, shopping malls, and fast-food chains; ordinary places frequented by regular folks. What made these stories even more fasci-nating was that these were not the sort of settings where you might expect to bump into one of the most famous people ever to walk the earth.

By the time we got to Detroit, Elvis sight-ings were at a fever pitch. We watched the Ti-gers play the Kansas City Royals one evening and enjoyed everything the old stadium had to offer.

We left the ball park and headed to a nearby town to secure a motel room for the night. We tuned into the Tigers’ postgame radio show and low and behold we discov-ered that Elvis had been spotted at the very stadium we just left. According to one of the fans that called into the show, Elvis was working as a food vendor at the ball park that evening; selling pizzas.

Bill and I looked at each other in disbelief. How could we have missed seeing Elvis? Was he working our section? Did we acci-dently bump into him and not realize it? The

thought that he was seemingly so close to us prompted us to head to Kalamazoo the next day to have lunch at the same Burger King that Elvis chose to reappear for the fi rst time since his reported death 11 years earlier.

We arrived at the Burger King and took photos of ourselves outside and inside the restaurant. We ordered Whoppers - as Elvis had done only weeks earlier - talked with the staff and sat in the dining area and talked baseball and Elvis. It really was one of the highlights of our trip.

But neither Bill, Elvis or I will never be able to eat at that Burger King again. The fast-food restaurant at 760 W. Michigan Ave. was closed on July 31, 2010, when the lease was not renewed.

As for the cow part of our trip, they were a never-ending part of the landscape in every state. We noticed that the cows back east and in the Midwest appeared much happier than the cattle in Oklahoma and west Texas. That’s probably because the cattle in those two states primarily had to survive on dirt and rocks - or so it seemed - as we drove by them on the freeway at 55 mph in my Toyota pickup truck.

As for Elvis, if he is still alive he would have celebrated his 80th birthday on Jan. 8. Maybe he’s kept himself looking trim all these years by eating Whoppers, drinking Slurpees (hopefully avoiding brain freezes) and hocking pizzas at ball games.

Dead or alive, Elvis will not soon be for-gotten. Neither will those three weeks I spent traveling the country with Bill in 1988.

Long live “the King.”

Continued from Page 8

Summers

A train stop to interesting Colorado destinations December was a time of the year when

people from all over the state had oppor-tunities to ride with Santa Claus; down at the Royal Gorge, at the railroad Museum in Golden, and even on Pikes Peak.

If you wanted to go further, the Du-rango and Silverton did one to a little Christmas village that is only there during the holidays. The village is all lit up like a giant Christmas tree, but by the end of the year it all goes away.

This time I will not be talking about that sort of train, but changes that were happening over a hundred years ago. The lake at Palmer Lake is destined to have water in it again. I have told you that this spot was called Divide. It was at the top of the ridge dividing Cherry Creek and Monument Creek’s water.

The lake had been enlarged to furnish water for the steam engines that stopped

there. A mountain stream had been redirected into the lake to add to the reli-ability, but there were few who lived in the area, that demand would be a long time away.

The little lake had been named Loch Lomond by the residents, and the hill overlooking it to the east, Ben Lomond, refl ecting reportedly the heritage of the fi rst station master living there. In 1882

the station was renamed from Divide to Loch Katerin, and a new community was laid out.

The Denver and Rio Grande at fi rst only used a spare box car for the depot. A cabin was eventually built. At the fi rst National Mining Exhibition in Denver a “model” railroad station was put on display in the D&RG exhibit. Once the exhibition was over it was moved to Loch Katerin. The lake was renamed Palmer Lake in 1884. A new railroad eating house was built along-side the quaint depot.

More changes were in store when the Santa Fe railroad built north from Colo-rado Springs. Between 1879 and 1886 the Santa Fe traveled to Denver on the Rio Grande’s tracks, but the congestion was just getting worse every week. The Santa Fe was not well accepted in the Palmer Lake area because it would be alongside

the east shore of the lake. It would spoil the great view from the town. Someone suggested they erect a fence to hide the new railroad. This went over well, and the Santa Fe’s reply was to put a tall tower on the station, much like a church spire. Then reality reached out, how tall a fence would be needed? What sort of a monster fence could stand in the sometimes bad winds?

In the end no fence was built. The two stations survived until about World War II, when both were replaced by a single, shared station, north of the lake. That one lasted up until about 1970. Today it is out in South Park, on a ranch property. Only occasionally do trains actually stop at the lake, mainly to cut off helper locomotives. Good thing they do not need the water anymore, the houses around certain do.

Exercise and the fountain of youth Editor’s Note: This is part 2 of a 4 part

series on exercise and aging.Mythology has it that Ponce de Leon

set sail from Europe in March of 1513 in a failed attempt to fi nd the historically elusive Fountain of Youth. He landed in what we know today as Florida and had he swam there from Europe, instead of sail-ing, he may have found it.

21st century researchers are touting exercise as the modern day Fountain of Youth and they have a ton of empirical evidence to back them up. Many of the recent research studies suggest that we can slow down and even reverse the aging process.

In fact, many of us can be in better health in our 70’s than we were in our 50’s. Cardiovascular conditioning … better known as aerobic exercise … is one of the undisputed avenues to reversing some of the deleterious effects of aging.

MedicineNet.com defi nes aerobic exer-cise as, “Brisk exercise that promotes the circulation of oxygen through the blood

and is associated with an increased rate of breathing. Examples include running, swimming and bicycling.”

The Mayo Clinic says cardiovascular conditioning can help with weight loss, in-crease your stamina, help ward off viral ill-ness and reduce your risk of heart disease, hypertension, type 2 diabetes and stroke. Aerobics has also been credited with decreasing the incidence of certain forms of cancer and dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

There is no longer an argument about whether you should do aerobics … just what, how much and at what intensity.

There’s a multitude of readily available modes of aerobic exercise that fi t the bill. You can walk, jog, cycle, swim, dance, cross-country ski, snow shoe, row or take indoor aerobic classes.

I’ve been asked countless time, “What is the best aerobic exercise?” My answer has always been the same … the one you’ll do.

How much is enough? Research shows that older adults can improve their fi t-ness level and achieve the health benefi ts ascribed to cardiovascular conditioning by doing 30 minutes or more of continu-ous moderate aerobic exercise 5 to 6 days a week.

If you’ve been sedentary, you’ll want to check with your doctor prior to com-mencing any exercise program. Start with only 10 to 15 minutes of aerobic exercise and slowly work your way up to 30 to 45 minutes most days of the week.

Focus on frequency fi rst, duration second and intensity last. You can gauge your intensity either by calculating your

Age-Predicted Target Heart Rate or by your Perceived Exertion.

The Age-Predicted Target Heart Rate formula for one minute is 220 minus your age times 70 percent for the lower range and 85 percent for your upper range. If you have been diagnosed with a disease process, you’re better off using the Per-ceived Exertion Scale, which calls for your aerobic exercise to range between your perception of “somewhat hard” to “hard” but not “very hard.’ This is my preferred method of gauging aerobic intensity.

There you have it. It’s really that simple.Just get yourself out the door and get

going. Who knows … you just might fi nd that elusive Fountain of Youth.

Cord Prettyman is a certifi ed Master Personal Trainer and owner of Absolute Workout Fitness and Post-Re-hab Studio in Woodland Park. He can be reached at 687-7437, by email at [emailprotected] or though his website at www.cordpretty-man.com.

We also wrote a bill with Orrin Hatch, a Republican senator from Utah, to make government programs more accountable and effective through social-impact bonds and pay-for-success contracts. The Pay-For-Performance Act will help states and communities achieve better results with less cost to taxpayers.

Under the model we’ve proposed, a

local government enters into a contract with a provider that commits to deliver-ing a set of services that are more effective and cost less than the results the govern-ment is currently receiving. An investor funds the project and is reimbursed with interest when the project meets its goals. If the providers don’t deliver the results they promised, the taxpayers are off the hook and the investors are not reimbursed. Social-impact bonds encourage innovation and more effective programs and services while keeping the risk away from taxpay-ers.

Continued from Page 8

Bennet

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Legislature opens with focus on pocketbooks Talk is bipartisan, but reality may di� er By Ivan Morenoand Kristen Wyatt Associated Press

The Colorado General Assembly opened for business under newly divided management Jan. 7, setting up confl icts on economic issues that both parties have identifi ed as key priorities this session.

Democrats retained control in the House and the governor’s offi ce, but Republicans took command of the state Senate for the fi rst time in a de-cade, gaining a one-vote majority.

In their opening remarks, newly selected leaders in the House and Senate promised to work together while outlining slightly different paths toward similar goals.

Minority chamber leaders, howev-er, took stances that are sure to place the Republicans and Democrats at odds.

The newly selected Senate presi-dent, Bill Cadman, made it clear that the GOP would push for tax cuts and workforce development programs. The Colorado Springs Republican also said his party would block any at-tempts to keep refunds due taxpayers from a projected budget surplus.

House Speaker Dickey Lee Hull-inghorst, the fi rst Democratic woman in state history to hold the position, made a call for job training initiatives aimed toward the middle class. “Be-cause when the middle class grows and thrives,’’ the Boulder County Democrat said, “all of Colorado ben-efi ts.’’

Hullinghorst also said legislators should be “standing up for small busi-nesses.’’

The minority leaders then drew battle lines.

House Republican Leader Brian DelGrosso warned Democrats to ex-pect a fi ght over any attempts to in-crease oversight of the oil and gas industry, and he reinforced Cadman’s position that tax refunds due under the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights weren’t negotiable.

The rebates might not be for large sums, but “Republicans believe that the people can spend their money

better than government can,’’ Del-Grosso said.

He also said Republicans want to chip away at a 2013 law that strength-ened renewable energy requirements for rural electricity providers. “Repub-licans support renewable energy,’’ he said. “But we do not support stifl ing our economy and killing jobs to pur-

sue an unrealistic agenda.’’In the Senate, Democratic Leader

Morgan Carroll talked about raising the minimum wage from its current $8.23 an hour, plus capping student loan debt and public tuition hikes.

“What’s right, what’s just, is an economy that works for everyone,’’ Carroll said, “not just a few at the top.’’

Outgoing Democratic Colorado House Speaker Rep. Mark Ferrandino, left, hands the gavel to incoming Democratic Colorado House Speaker Rep. Dickey Lee Hullinghorst during the opening session of the 2015 Colorado Legislature, at the Capitol in Denver on Jan. 7, 2015.

New Colorado State Senate President Bill Cadman, R-Colorado Springs, presides over the Senate during the opening session of the 2015 Colorado Legislature, at the Capitol in Denver on Jan. 7.

New Colorado State Senate Majority Leader Mark Sche� el, R-Parker, speaks with his daughter Maria, a guest, during a recess in the opening session of the 2015 Colorado Legislature, at the Capitol in Denver on Jan. 7. Republicans have control of the Senate for the � rst time in a decade. Associated Press photos

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Pikes Peak Courier 11 January 14, 2015

11

TRANSITION CAREAn Important Step in Healthcare Recovery

Pikes Peak Regional Hospital will host a Community Seminar to dis-cuss the importance of its Transition Care Program

This program allows patients to move their level of care from “acute” to “skilled rehabilitation” but remain in a hospital setting

Transition Care is an extended care option for individuals who have re-covered from an illness or injury and no longer need to be in an acute hospital setting, but are not yet able to care for themselves at home

FREE COMMUNITY SEMINAR

DATE: Tuesday, Jan 20, 2015

TIME: 11:45 am

LOCATION: Woodland Park Senior Center (312 N. Center St.)

PLEASE RSVP TO:[emailprotected] or Deb Idleman at 719-686-5802

Lunch is included

Guest Presenter is Wendy Westall, RN, BSN, CCM Discharge Planner with the Transition Care Program

Presented By:16420 W. Hwy. 24Woodland Park, CO 80863

7 - 11 pm atDouble Eagle

Hotel and CasinoCripple Creek

$35 per Person

Victorian or Formal Attire Requested

• Dance Mistress:Sharon Guli

• Music: Grandview Victorian Orchestra

• Delicious hors d’oeuvres

• Cash Bar

Special Gift for the couple who submits the best “sweetheart” story with their reservation.

www.goldcampvictoriansociety.org

• Valet Parking

For more information, contact:Hedy Boyce, Chairperson

719-689-3700or

Howard Melching719-689-0907

For Reservations:Send check to G.C.V.S

P.O Box 1188Cripple Creek, CO 80813

(No Refunds)

Social hour 6 pm - 7 pm

Council considers course for correcting killer curve Mayor says Immanent Domain should only be used as a last resort By N. W. Oliver Contributing writer

On January 7 at a work session prior to the regular Cripple Creek City Coun-cil meeting, the council considered plans to redesign the sharp curve on Teller 1 between the Dollar General and Venture Foods. The curve has caused several fa-tal accidents in the past, one as recent as 2014, and is a major hazard for city road workers charged with its upkeep.

The various plans, presented by City Administrator Ray DuBoise and City Works Director Jim Blasing, all require strips of land along the route currently held by two private parties. One of the parties has al-ready agreed to accept fair compensation as was determined by one appraiser’s es-timate on behalf of the city and another appraiser’s estimate on behalf of the land-owner.

While negotiations continue with the second landowner, DuBoise and City At-torney, Lee Phillips expressed doubts that a reasonable offer would be accepted. If the situation continues, the city will be left with only two reasonable options; immedi-ately seize the land under “Immanent Do-main” laws, or wait up to two years for the

price of the land to be settled by a judge.“Immanent Domain should only be

used as a last resort,” said Mayor Bruce Brown. In addition to the hostile na-ture of Immanent Domain proceed-ings, they also possess a major inherent risk; if the judge determines the price of the land to be more than thirty percentgreater than the city’s last offer, all court fees, as well as the determined price of the land must be paid by the city. As the land-owner’s latest asking price is already more than $35,000 above the city’s appraisal, if the judge should agree with the landown-er’s appraisal the city would be liable to pay for the landowner’s court fees as well.

The risk of not acquiring the land pres-ently could be even more costly pointed

out DuBoise. According to him, the es-timated cost to the city of redoing the curve has increased $176,299 since it was fi rst considered in 2012. “Waiting an-other year could cost even more,” saidDuBoise.

The cost could be more than just dollars and cents as well. The city of Cripple Creek has a tough decision to make; one with the alienation of its landowners, the safety of residents and road workers, and the secu-rity of its coffers at stake.

Also at the meeting, the 2015 offi cial city announcement and notice locations were determined. As they were last year, the locations are, outside the front door of City Hall, at the Cripple Creek Post Offi ce and within the Pikes Peak Courier.

Fire Department. Call Meridel Gatterman, 719-689-5861.

TAI CHI is o� ered from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Thursdays at the Woodland Park Library, in the downstairs resource room. Call Cheryl Koc, 719-687-2633 or Judy Ross at 719-686-9122.

TAI CHI is o� ered from 9-10 a.m. Fridays at the Woodland Park Library, in the downstairs community room. Call Penny Brandt, 719-687-1848 or Judy Ross at 719-686-9122.

TAI CHI, Sun Style 73 Forms, is o� ered from 10-11 a.m. Fridays at the Woodland Park Library, in the downstairs com-munity room. Call Cheryl Koc, 719-687-2633.

TELLER COUNTY Shooting Society,an organization estab-lishing a new gun range in Teller County, meets the second Saturday of every other month at the Divide Community Center and the Elks Club in Victor. The club has 52 members and expects to grow substantially once ground breaks in the spring. All of the political hurdles are completed and all of the necessary applications have all been approved.Go to www.tcss-co.org.

THERAPEUTIC YOGA-BASED stress-reduction classes o� ered from 5-6 p.m. Sundays in Woodland Park.Welcoming, fun, and a� ordable.Cost is $7 per class. See www.bStillcoun-seling.com or contact Chrissy Bensen, MA-MFT, 719-510-2743 for details.

TELLER COUNTY 4-H Shooting Sports Club meets the � rst Sunday of each month at the Pikes Peak Community Club (PPCC) in Divide at 4 p.m. 4-H projects/disciplines covered by the club: .22 and Air Ri� e, Archery, Shotgun, and Air Pistol. For more information about the club meetings or project/discipline practices, contact Bob Tyler, 719-748-1335 or [emailprotected]. For 4-H enrollment contact Mark Platten at 719-686-7961.

THURSDAY NIGHT Beginners Book Study meets from 7-8 p.m. Thursdays at Woodland Park Community Church. Email [emailprotected] for information.

UTE PASS Historical Society o� ers free tours (donations gratefully accepted) of History Park every second Saturday of the month from June through September. History Park is open from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Come tour our old buildings, and learn some of the history of Ute Pass. We also o� er a walking tour of Woodland Park which meets at the Museum Center at 10:30. The Museum Center at History Park is located at 231 E. Henrietta Avenue in Woodland Park, next to the library. For information, contact UPHS at 719-686-7512 or check out our website: www.utepasshistoricalsociety.org. Also, like us on Facebook.

UTE PASS Historical Society Main O� ce and book store are open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesdays through Saturdays in the Museum Center building at History Park, 231 E. Henrietta, next to the Woodland Park Library. Tours of History Park are available during these hours. A $5 donations is appreciated. Call 719-686-7512 at least 15 minutes before a tour. Go to utepasshistoricalsociety.org.

WOODLAND PARK Ceili Club hast monthly ceilis (“kay-lees”), which is Irish for a dance party.The purpose is to bring social Irish dance to the Teller County community. These ceilis are open to the public, with no dance experience required. The dances are taught as part of the event. Visit www.mountain-eire.org and see the Ceili Club tab, or call 686-1325.

WOODLAND PARK Saddle Club, providing community camaraderie among humans and horses since 1947, sponsors gymkhanas, jackpots, dances, barbecues, parades, trail rides and more. Join us. For information, contact [emailprotected]. Visit www.wpsaddleclub.com.

WOODLAND PARK Wind Symphony, under the direction of Craig Harms, rehearses at 7 p.m. Tuesdays in the Woodland Park Middle School band room.All instrumental musicians are welcome. Visit www.woodlandparkwindsymphony.com to learn more about this ensemble and other musical groups which are part of the Woodland Park Wind Symphony, Woodland Winds, Woodland Brass Quintet and Brass Choir and the Swing Factory Big Band. Craig can also be reached at 719-687-2210.

YOGA CLASSES are o� ered at 9 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, with a senior class at 10:30 a.m. Tuesdays, at the Florissant Grange, 2009 County Road 31. Certi� ed instructor. Everyone welcome. Call Debbie at 719-748-3678 for information.

YOGA CLASSES are o� ered in Woodland Park. All levels are welcome. Contact Michelle Truscelli at 719-505-5011 or check out www.shakti3yoga.com for information.

YOGA FOR Every Body 2014 yoga classes o� ered at various locations in the Pikes Peak area. All classes free or by dona-tion.Call Stacy for more information at 719-689-5745 or email [emailprotected].

XINGYI IS o� ered from 7-9 p.m. Wednesdays at the Wood-land Park Recreation Center. Must be 18 or older. Contact Je� at 816-260-8595 for information.

SOCIAL

A COURSE in Miracles classes meets at 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays in Woodland Park. Call 719-286-8421 or e-mail [emailprotected] for information.

A PEACE Visioning You may think you are limited in your ability to improve conditions on earth. Nothing is further from the truth. You can be an instrument for change by adding to the love and peace sent worldwide from the peace visioning circle – either silently, verbally, or visually. The circle is for people from all walks of life with a passion to bring unity and light into our world. We gather at 10:30 a.m. every Saturday in Woodland Park. Contact Barbara Royal, CSD, 719-687-6823 or [emailprotected].

ABOVE THE Clouds Cruisers meet the � rst Friday of the month at 6:30 p.m. at 1120 West Bowman Ave., Woodland Park. For information contact Marsh at 719-687-1058.

AMERICAN LEGION Post 1980 Woodland Park meets at 7 p.m. the fourth Tuesday of each month at Grange Hall on Hwy 67, about three miles north of the US-24/Hwy-67 junction in Woodland Park. Visit http://post1980.org.

AMERICAN LEGION Post 171 meets at 7 p.m. at the Post Building, 400 East Carr Ave. in Cripple Creek.

ART RECEPTION Today is planned for the second Friday of the month and will feature a di� erent artist at Park State Bank in Woodland Park.

BILL HARPER, as seen on the Grand Ole Opry, performs 4–7 p.m. every Saturday at Oney’s Restaurant in Florissant. Enjoy old country classic music in a family friendly atmosphere.

CC&V COFFEE Club meets at 10 a.m. Mondays at the Cripple Creek and Victor Gold Mining Company Visitor Center, 371 E. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek. Chat with friends over a cup of co� ee, or network with businesspeople. Not just co� ee, but also refreshments and free Wi-Fi will be provided as you sit and visit with others and get the latest community news, or mining information. Refreshment donations will be given to the Aspen Mine Center. Contact the CC&V Visitor Center at 719-689-2341, or Brad Poulson at 719-689-4052 for more information.

COLORADO MOUNTED Rangers Troop “B” is looking for civic minded people who wish to volunteer and contribute to their community. We primarily serve Teller and Park counties, and assist other troops throughout the state. Troop B meets at 6 p.m. the � rst Thursday of each month at the Highland Bible Church, 800 Research Drive, Woodland Park. We are an all-volunteer organization that is recognized as an auxiliary law enforcement agency by the state of Colorado. We assist law enforcement agencies, forest service, and search and rescue

organizations. Experience is not necessary, just a willingness to contribute to your community. To volunteer, or for more information, contact us through www.coloradoranger.org.

COLORADO MOUNTED Rangers Troop “I” is looking for responsible and dedicated volunteers who want to make a di� erence serving their community. You are invited to our monthly meeting the � rst Friday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Pikes Peak National Bank, in the upstairs conference room, 2401 W. Colorado Ave, on the corner of Colorado Ave and 24th Street. Free parking is available for the meeting in the bank employee parking lot on the south side of the bank’s drive-up facility. Visit http://itroop.coloradoranger.org or e-mail [emailprotected].

CRIPPLE CREEK Friendship Club meets from 1-3 p.m. at the Henry C. “June” Hack Arena in City Park. The club is free and o� ers an opportunity to meet with acquaintances and make new friends.

DIVIDE PLAYGROUP meets from 9-10: 30 a.m. Mondays and Wednesdays at Community Partnership in Divide. Ffdd program. Call 686-0705 more more info. Drop-ins welcome.

DOLL LOVERS of Teller County are invited to meetings at 10:30 a.m. the � rst Thursday of every month at the Village at Skyline. It’s free. A variety of programs include the study of an-tiques, and vintage and modern dolls. Everyone older than age

Continued from Page 6

AREA CLUBS

Clubs continues on Page 15

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12 Pikes Peak Courier January 14, 2015

12-Life

Poet is the ‘real deal’ through authentic songs, poetryCowgirl poet, songwriter, entertainer Susie Knight wins Western Music Association 2014 Female Poet of the YearBy Sonja OliverCorrespondent

Cowgirl Poet Susie Knight recently won accolades from the Western Music Associ-ation as the 2014 Female Poet of the Year at its annual awards ceremony held in Albu-querque, New Mexico this past November.

Knight, is a cowgirl poet, singer/song-writer and entertainer, who celebrates 50 years on stage and in the saddle. A former barrel racer, riding instructor, horse train-er, working ranch cowgirl, wrangler and trail guide, Knight hangs her hat in Conifer, Colo. and has many ties to both Park and Teller Counties.

“This is the award I’d been shooting for since 2010, when I became aware of the WMA. The level of excellence in this asso-ciation is stellar. For me to be honored like this, I was shocked and very elated. It was kind of hard to breathe for those few sec-onds,” Knight said upon hearing that she had won the honor.

“It’s a milestone. The other nominees were very talented lady poets. To have a such a huge honor to be named out of hundreds of other poets... it’s humbling,” Knight said.

In addition to WMA’s 2014 Female Poet of the Year, Knight has received awards for the 2013 Cowboy Idol Poet, and Academy of Western Artists 2013 Will Rogers Award for Cowgirl Poet.

In 2012, Knight’s 2010 debut CD release, “Western Wordsmith,” an all-original col-lection of cowboy poetry and music based on her authentic perspectives on western life, won the WMA Cowboy Poetry CD of the Year.

Western inspirationKnight’s poignant, visual story-like cow-

boy poetry and western song lyrics capture a woman’s perspective on ranching, rodeo and relationships which come from her own “true- to- life” experiences from time spent in the saddle as a working cowgirl and living the ranching life.

Many of the songs and poems are re-flections of Knight’s observations of her western surroundings, experiences and re-lationships, and of which Knight considers to be a “tribute to some of the most memo-rable experiences and people in my life.”

“I always try to approach my songs from different perspectives. Once you start writ-ing it’s hard to stop. There are so many sto-ries to tell and there is always more story to be told and things we don’t want to forget in each of us,” Knight said.

When writing cowboy poetry, Knight says the combination of spoken words, rhyme and meter hold a listener’s attention in a way that makes them want to continue listening. Knight’s poems bring to life her relationships with friends, family, horses, cattle and the multi-dimensional aspects of the classic Western landscape.

In her capacity as a cowboy poet, sing-er/songwriter and entertainer, Knight per-forms live at cowboy poetry gatherings and special events throughout the West.

“I am an entertainer as was Buffalo Bill with his Wild West Show. In fact, he was the very first ‘American Idol’ - a true show-man,” Knight says of her inspiration for the song-poem “The Spirit of Buffalo Bill” which is featured on “Leather Wings” and nominated for the 2013 Academy of West-ern Artists’ Western Song of the Year.

Cowgirl from the age of three

Raised in the Chicago suburbs, Knight says she became a “cowgirl from the age of three” when she rode a pony for the first time at a Wisconsin dude ranch. With professional singers for parents, Knight debuted on stage when just a toddler, that same year she rode her first pony.

Her birthday wish for a horse finally came true when she turned 15. Since that time, she has owned AQHA horses, was privately trained in western riding and dressage for over 15 years, competed in Western Pleasure horse shows and bar-rel racing, and continues to trail ride for enjoyment or to help a rancher out with a cattle drive.

Ranch work is what brought Knight to the Teller and Park County area.

“My cousins in Florissant needed some help on their ranch and had me come and live with them and that’s when I met my husband,” Knight said.

Sharing the multi-dimentional facets of her personal life through poetry, Knight re-lates in “My Western Man” the story about her first encounter with husband, David Knight, at the City Market in Woodland Park.

“So, here’s the way I met my man. It

wasn’t by some clever plan.No dreamin’ scheme to fill the days be-

fore.It surely was our destiny; Divine Ap-

pointment for he and mein Aisle Four of our local grocery store”“When I married David, he said he

wanted me to go after my dream, to pursue the call on my life,” Knight said.

“David said ‘the heck you’re staying at home, you’re going to work.’ If it wasn’t for him I couldn’t have done it. He gave me the green light and support I needed. (Going to cowboy poetry gatherings) brought me to an audience that I hadn’t been able to reach before.”

Knight’s poetry brings to life the people whose lives have touched hers and whose lives she has touched. In the poem “Ernie Snare” Knight is anticipating a ride to help multigenerational cattleman and Four Mile resident Ernie Snare, move his herd from pasture to pasture.

I met him several years ago when I was passin’ through,

there at the Grange on Thursdays where the local folks all knew

that the pot luck always satisfied, and the music’s mighty fair.

And dancin’ with Miss Carolyn was the rancher, Ernie Snare.

‘You’re the real thing darlin’Although Knight began writing cow-

boy songs and poems while in her teens, it wasn’t until 2010 that Knight busted onto the western music and cowboy poetry gathering scene.

True West magazine’s March 2012 Spe-cial Collector’s Series interviewed “Cow-boys & Aliens” movie cast member, Rex Rideout, and asked his opinion on what’s hot in western culture.

Out of all the newcomers in today’s western music and poetry arenas, Rideout chose Susie Knight as the ‘Rookie to Watch’ and stated, “As a Western entertainer, Susie Knight is no rookie.”

Another accolade comes from world-famous cowboy poet legend Baxter Black who personally told Knight ‘You’re the real thing darlin.’”

For contact information regarding Susie Knight’s upcoming performances, book-ings or album sales contact Susie Knight at (303) 495-4869 or go to: www.susieknight.com.

Susie and husband David Knight, the man she lassoed in her poem “My Western Man” following a chance meeting at Woodland Park’s City Market. Courtesy photo

Colorado Cowboy Gathering to be held in Golden Jan. 22-25By Sonja OliverContributing writer

Western music and cowboy poetry enthusiasts are invited to come to the 2015 Colorado Cowboy Gathering in Golden, Colo. for a four-day round-up to be held January 22-25. Cowgirl poet, singer/songwriter and entertainer Susie Knight, the West-ern Music Association’s 2014 Female Poet of the Year, will be performing throughout the event and is featured on the Main Stage on Sunday, January 25 at 1p.m.

For more than a quarter century, the Colorado Cowboy Gathering has drawn many western mu-

sic and cowboy poetry fans to hear award-winning cowboy poets and musicians from the American West, Canada and from down-under, Australia.

The gathering will include three evening per-formances, two full-days of popular theme ses-sions, a Sunday matinee, Cowboy Church on Sun-day morning, and two workshops: Pop Wagner’s Cinch Making Class and Gary Allegretto’s Learn to Play Cowboy Harmonica Instantly.

Performances and workshops will be held at the Miner’s Alley Playhouse and the American Moun-taineering Center. For more information about the gathering go to www.coloradocowboygathering.com. Bill Barwick Susie Knight

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Pikes Peak Courier 13 January 14, 2015

13

To reserve your ad space contact

Anita Riggle | [emailprotected]

A publication ofA publication of

2015Be a part of the

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K-8TH GRADE Saturday, January 24th from 10am-2pm

WPHS CHEERLEADERS

Forms are available at all WPSD schools.

Please contact Alli Weissman at 719-433-6478 for more information

ARE HOSTING A CLINIC

Cost is $20 for pre-registration or $25 the day of the Clinic.

Western Music Association’s Colorado Chapter open to membership

By Sonja OliverContributing writer

The Western Music Association is an organization that encourages and supports the preservation, perfor-mance and composition of historic traditional and contemporary music and poetry of ‘The West.’

Cowgirl poet Susie Knight serves as secretary for the Western Music Association’s Colorado Chapter, and has made it her mission to promote western music and poetry events throughout Colorado. She produced two events at Teller County locations last year at the Florissant Grange and Cripple Creek’s Gold Bar Room.

“I’m hoping to produce a few more of these events in an effort to keep our western culture alive and well through cowboy music and poetry,”

Knight said.“It has been my passion to show-

case the talented performers of west-ern music and cowboy poetry here in our state of Colorado through our Western Music Association. Member-ship is open to all who are interested and you don’t have to be an enter-tainer. Bring your guitar, bring your poems and share your songs and po-ems,” Knight said.

According to Knight, “Once you’ve experienced western entertainment you’ll be a fan for life. I’d be hard-pressed to fi nd someone in any age group who doesn’t like western mu-sic and cowboy poetry once they’ve heard it.”According to information stated on its website, www.western-music.org, “Western Music is the folk music of the Western life style and vista.”

“Some Western music originates

from roots in English, Scottish, Irish, and Welsh ballads, as well as musical infl uences from the European coun-tries of immigrants who “went west” and some carries jazz and blues ori-gins.

As stated on the website, “While “Cowboy” music is an important part of the history of Western Music, the stories and lifestyles of the larger populations of Western culture are equally important: settlers, farmers, ranchers, horsem*n and women, sol-diers and the women who accompa-nied them into the west, miners, op-portunists, gamblers, saloon keepers, school teachers, and other town folk who populated the great American west are all subjects of modern day Western music.”

For more information about the Western Music Association go to: www.westernmusic.org.

Cowgirl Poet Susie Knight of Conifer, Colo. holds an award trophy for 2014 Western Music Association Female Poet of the Year, which was presented at the WMA annual awards ceremony in Albuquerque, N.M. Photo by Jack Hummel

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14 Pikes Peak Courier January 14, 2015

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HERE’S my CARD

YOUR CARD HERE!

Contact your sales consultant:

Anita Riggle

[emailprotected]

Check out our programs!www.cpteller.org

Strengthening Families

• Cooking and Nutrition classes • Adult Education classes and GED test prep • Adult Exercise classes - yoga, zumba, and more! • Health Coverage Assistance - CHP+/Medicaid/SSI • Parenting Workshops- for all ages, plus NEW divorce seminars • Parent Engagement - make a difference in your child’s community! • Divide Playgroup- for parents and tots ages 0-4 • Energy Outreach Colorado - energy bill assistance • Parents as Teachers • Healthier Living CO - stress and disease management workshops • Community Gardens - locations throughout Teller County! • Connect for Health

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COMMUNITY PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

www.bStillcounseling.com [emailprotected]

Chrissy Bensen, MA, MFTMarriage and Family Therapist

Two Convenient office Locations: Woodland Park & Church in the Wildwood (GMF)

Mention this ad for special 3-session starter package for $150.

Fun, engaging monthly workshops and groups for individuals, couples, single parents,

step-families. Weekly relaxation classes.

719-510-2743

AUTOMOTIVE

Teller County’s Oldest Family Owned & Operated Alignment & Tire Center

687-2446220 S. Burdette • Woodland Park

Owners Jamie Schumacher & Justin Schumacher

FENCING

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HOME TOWN GARAGE

MASSAGE THERAPY

An Angels Touch Massage TherapyChristi Wilhite (970) 596-8328

Home: (719) 689-5555 | [emailprotected]

Capelli Salon in Woodland Park - Mon & SatDouble Eagle Casino in Cripple Creek - Tues-Sat

Call for availability

REAL ESTATE

400 W. US Hwy 24, Suite 201P.O. Box 526

Woodland Park, CO [emailprotected]

www.LenoreHotchkiss.comPhone: 719-687-1700

Cell: 719-359-1340

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Pikes Peak Courier 0114 - [PDF Document] (15)

Pikes Peak Courier 15 January 14, 2015

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Joy to the World

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day SaintsSunday Worship - 10 a.m.

785 Apache Trail, Woodland ParkPhone – (719) 472-4609

www.Mormon.orgIntellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved

Experience the true meaning of Christmas with the story of the Savior’s birth.

For a free DVD, please call 877-300-8000.

New Late Hours! 8pm Every Thursday

Your pets can play all day in a safe, fully supervised environment, where you can observe them on webcam!

Compassionate personalized medicine and surgery for canine, feline and equine patients

Equine doctors with advanced training

Doggie Day Care

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Full Service Equine Hospital

www.wpamc.com

MEET OUR DOCTORS

Dr. Brittany FactorDr. Michael FactorDr. Brady Thompson

15226 W Hwy 24 Woodland Park 1/2 mile West of Pikes Peak Regional Hospital

The only AAHA Accredited Hospital in Teller County

719-687-9201 We have extended hours on Thursday’s to accommodate our hard working clients We have extended hours on Thursday’s to accommodate our hard working clients We have extended hours on Thursday’s to accommodate our hard working clients We have extended hours on Thursday’s to accommodate our hard working clients

Hodges resigns as CASA director By Pat Hill [emailprotected]

While there were hints along the way, nonetheless, the announcement last week that Trudy Strewler Hodges would resign in March as the chief executive offi cer of Court Appointed Special Advocate was noteworthy.

Hodges has accepted a position with the Pikes Peak Community Foundation as the chief executive offi cer. She replaces Michael Hannigan, who is retiring after leading the organization for the past 16 years.

“This was a very challenging decision,” Hodges said. “I love and value our staff and our volunteers. My relationships with these people go very deep.”

A nonprofi t organization whose vol-unteers appear in court to advocate for children caught in the social-services sys-tems in El Paso and Teller counties, un-der Hodge’s 25-year leadership CASA has served 10,000 children.

In a video presentation, Hodges is emo-tional about the role of CASA in domestic-violence and abuse in the lives of children. “There are some really dark places in this community,” she said. “Horrible things have happened to children.”

In the video, Hodges recounts the case of a girl who was sexually abused by her father, a minister in Colorado Springs. In a court appearance, only the CASA volun-teer and Hodges were there to support the child. The minister, on the other hand, was fl anked by his entire congregation.

With the ongoing encouragement of the CASA volunteer, the child had agreed to testify against her father. “The volun-teer put the light in her life; I knew the girl would survive and go on to be a success-ful adult,” Hodges said, with a catch in her voice. “This case was so profound, it touched me deeply.”

Under Hodges’ leadership, CASA is one of the most recognized nonprofi ts in the region, with the annual fundraiser, Light of Hope, attracting up to 1,800 donors. In 25 years, CASA’s operating budget has grown from $22,000 to $2 million.

“I think it’s important for the com-munities to know that I started talking with the board about my moving on from CASA three years ago and we built a very-involved succession plan, rewrote my job

description and surveyed stakeholders to learn what competencies we needed in a new leader,” Hodges said. “I feel like my work is done. This is a point in time where a new leader could come in, carry forward and take the organization to new heights.”

With no plan initially for a follow-up ca-reer, she said, the job opening as a result of Hannigan’s retirement presented possibili-ties. “The Pikes Peak Community Founda-tion piqued my interest,” she said. “I think the foundation gives an opportunity for me and the foundation to be more central to philanthropy in this community and this region, with an opportunity for more

infl uence and greater quality of life for the members of our community.”

In a public farewell to Hodges, Dawn Ig-natius, former board member and Wood-land Park resident, said, “Trudy Strewler Hodges has been a blessing to the most vulnerable children of the Pikes Peak Re-gion. As a former board chair, I am proud to have worked with her and the entire CASA organization! On a personal level, I admire this woman so much and will miss her. She is a gentle yet powerful force and voice for abused and neglected children. I know she will do great things at PPCF.”

Hodges’ last day at CASA is March 31.

“It’s been my privilege - I feel like I’ve got-ten far more out of it than I’ve ever given,” she said. “This was the hardest decision of my life. CASA has fi lled me in a way that most people don’t experience in life, so CASA has been an absolute gift in my life.”

While she will no longer be the master of ceremonies at the CASA fundraiser April 30, Hodges plans to be at the Antler’s Hotel that day. “I will be there, will fi ll a table,” she said. “I am committed to being in-volved.”

In the meantime, Mittie Pedraza, for-mer director of programs at CASA, has been named as the interim director.

Trudy Strewler Hodges announced her retirement last week as the executive director of Court Appointed Special Advocate. Hodges has taken a position as the executive director of the Pikes Peak Community Foundation. Photo by Pat Hill

12 IS welcome. Call Nancy at 719-390-8098.

FLORISSANT GRANGE No. 420 meets at 7 p.m. the second Monday of each month. The grange continues to o� er the Florissant Jammers every Thursday for a potluck dinner at 6 p.m. followed by the music of the great Jammers until 9 p.m. All are welcome to come to the Grange. Call 719-748-0358.

THE FLORISSANT Library Book Club welcomes all book readers to its group. It meets at 10:30 a.m. the third Wednes-day of the month. Call 719-748-3939.

GOLD CAMP Victorian Society is dedicated to the preserva-tion of the history of Cripple Creek and the surrounding area. The Society plays a role in Cripple Creek’s historic events, celebrations, and festivals, including Donkey Derby Days,

the Gold Camp Christmas, the Mt. Pisgah Speaks cemetery tour, the Salute To American Veterans, and many others. The Gold Camp Victorian Society also supports events in other communities in Teller County. The Society also sponsors a Victorian ball as well as a Victorian tea each year, both of which are open to members and non-members alike. Gold Camp Victorian Society members can be seen dressed in period attire welcoming visitors to Cripple Creek on Saturday afternoons during the summer months. The Society also includes the “Smokin’s Guns” club which presents historically-based skits and other entertainment during local events and festivals. The Gold Camp Victorian Society meets on the fourth Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. in the Centennial Building in Cripple Creek. Persons interested in participating as members of the Gold Camp Victorian Society are encouraged to call 689-0907 for more information.

GUITAR, VOCALS Ted Newman entertains with his guitar

and vocals from 5:30-8:30 p.m. every Thursday, Saturday and Sunday at The Pantry in Green Mountain Falls. Call 719-684-9018 for details and reservations.

Continued from Page 11

AREA CLUBSClubs continues on Page 16

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‘American Sniper’ is quintessential EastwoodProtagonist is like weary hero of WesternsBy Jake CoyleAssociated Press

A mere six months after releasing the Four Seasons drama “Jersey Boys,’’ Clint Eastwood has again lapped his younger di-recting colleagues with his second film of 2014 and his best movie in years. “Ameri-can Sniper’’ is quintessentially Eastwood: a tautly made, confidently constructed examination of the themes that have long dominated his work.

“American Sniper,’’ based on Navy SEAL marksman Chris Kyle’s best-selling mem-oir, is both a tribute to the warrior and a lament for war. Shirking politics, the film instead sets its sights squarely on its elite protagonist (Bradley Cooper), a traditional American war hero in an untraditional war.

Here is an archetypal American: a chew-spitting, beer-drinking Texas cowboy who enlists after the 1998 bombings of Ameri-can embassies with resolute righteousness and noble patriotic duty. The once way-ward Kyle finds his true calling in the Navy, and he heads to Iraq with a moral certainty that no amount of time served or kills will shake. He’s there to kill bad guys — “sav-ages’’ he calls them at one point.

And kill he does. With 160 confirmed kills, Kyle is believed to be the most lethal sniper in U.S. history. The film starts with a remarkable scene of Kyle poised on an Iraq rooftop with a young boy holding a grenade in his scope. Eastwood and screenwriter Jason Hall flash back to Kyle’s upbringing, where his father taught him about “the gift of aggression’’ and the honor of defending others.

It’s the first of many cuts between far-away battle and the personal life Kyle leaves behind. Shortly before shipping out, he weds Taya, played by Sienna Miller, who

gives a refreshingly lively take on a usu-ally one-dimensional character. She’s more cynical than her husband, who returns to their growing family between tours, his head increasingly stuck in Iraq.

He’s much like a terse and weary West-ern hero torn from home; an early shot through the front door of their home evokes the famous final image of John Ford’s “The Searchers.’’ Instead of a Stetson, Kyle wears a baseball cap, turned backward when he takes aim. “I’m better when it’s breathing,’’ he tells an early instructor after shooting a

snake.Cooper is extraordinary as Kyle. He has

beefed up, adopted an authentic Texas drawl and endowed Kyle with a command-ing swagger. The war steadily takes its toll on his psyche, even if he’d never admit it. When Kyle’s younger brother, passing him on a tarmac in Iraq, curses the war, Kyle looks him at with genuine befuddlement.

Eastwood has, of course, long been drawn to stories about violence — neces-sary if regrettable — in meting out justice and the cost to those that carry its heavy burden. The question is if the mythical rending of “American Sniper’’ fits its more complex basis of reality. Kyle, who died tragically in early 2013, belies easy sum-mary. He, for one, boasted of shooting loot-ers in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. His clarity of mission could also be said to mirror the mistaken convictions of politi-

cians that put him in Iraq.But I believe Eastwood’s purpose here

is to depict a straight arrow in the fog of a questionable war. (A pivotal late scene takes place in a gathering sandstorm that obliterates the frame in clouds of dust.) The soldier is true; the war — confused, bureaucratic — isn’t.

The film’s narrow perspective, centered on Kyle, is both the best and worst thing about it. “American Sniper’’ may be a much needed tribute to the sacrifice of American soldiers, but it’s lacking context. Few Iraqis here are seen as anything but the enemy.

When Eastwood delved into World War II in “Flags of Our Fathers,’’ his switch to the other side of the battlefield for “Letters From Iwo Jima’’ remains one of the most profound moral decisions in moviemak-ing. As fine as “American Sniper’’ is, it’s in need of a companion piece.

In this image released by Warner Bros. Pictures, Bradley Cooper appears in a scene from “American Sniper.” Associated Press photo

Grant opens up economic opportunitiesBy Pat [emailprotected]

A $900,000 grant to the Early Head Start program in Cripple Creek is revolutionary as it relates to the effects on child care in Teller County.

“We want to get those child-care homes licensed and provide them the resources they need to be successful,” said Patty Waddle, director of the program in the Cripple Creek/Victor School District.

With licensed care available to just 7 percent of the county’s infant/toddler pop-ulation, parents struggle with a variety of issues, financial as well as the potential for abuse and neglect of their children.

“Our crisis is not for families in poverty, it’s for all families with infants and tod-dlers,” Waddle said.

Among the impediments to running licensed child-care facilities are the rules, regulations and requirements for ongoing training. “It’s hard to keep a license be-cause of all the hoops they have to jump through,” said Lisa Noble, coordinator of

the Gold Belt Build a Generation. “This grant is going to assist them to stay li-censed.”

If there’s a “catch,” to being part of the economic opportunities for child-care fa-cilities, providers would have to abide by Early Head Start rules, Waddle said. “But the providers won’t be on their own; we’ll have a program manager whose sole func-tion is working with private providers,” she said.

The rules include adherence to nutri-tion requirements for children. The infants and toddlers, however, in the Early Child-hood program already have nutritious meals, each prepared by Shelby Larsen.

“There is no processed food here,” Wad-dle said.

Along with the rules, however, is support for private child-care facilities provided by the grant, including curriculum guidelines and educational toys, for instance.

With the cash infusion from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Servic-es, families in Teller County have a chance to be lifted from the cycle of instability of finding quality child care.

The stories are wrenching, the need ex-orbitant, turmoil told in letters by parents and officials as a show of support for the grant application. For instance, a mother writes of being unable to care for her fam-ily due to either being fired or quitting a number of jobs over the child-care issue. A father writes of trying to seek help from co-workers, friends or neighbors.

“They really show the crisis this com-munity is in,” Noble said.

Kim Mauthe, director of Teller County’s Department of Social Services, writes, in part, about the possibilities inherent to ex-panding child care: “We would anticipate seeing fewer referrals to our child-welfare system due to children being left in high-risk situations.”

Brenda Riley, director of human re-sources for Bronco Billy’s Casino, writes: “It is disheartening to lose quality employees because they are unable to find child-care services. Distance and travel also present obstacles to these services.”

The funds, a collaboration of the federal agencies, Head Start and the Division of Child Care, are expected to serve up to 50

additional infants and toddlers while of-fering an economic boost in Teller County. As well, the children will have access to the school-based health clinic.

“As a stopgap, until we get everything in place, we might provide more services here,” Waddle said, referring to the Early Head Start facility adjacent to Cresson El-ementary School. “Our sole purpose is to improve the child-care industry in Teller County. Our ultimate goal is to have li-censed care for infants and toddlers 24/7.”

In the southern part of the county, a place marked by transiency, instability among families, lack of services, poverty and a degree of homelessness, the $900,000 federal grant reflects the effort of people who strive the make a difference.

Among them are the grant writers, Wad-dle, Noble, Krys Arrick, Early Childhood Family Support, and Janice Crawford, ad-ministrative assistant.

“I really think this grant is going to cre-ate economic stability for our county,” Noble said. “Nothing does that better than child care.”

ABOUT THE MOVIE“American Sniper,’’ a Warner Bros. release, is rated

PG-13 by the Motion Picture Association of America for “strong and disturbing war violence, and language throughout including some sexual references.’’ Running time: 124 minutes. Three stars out of four.

HELP U Club meets the third Thursday of every month. Pot luck at noon and meeting at 1 p.m. We help people and other nonpro�ts in Teller County and the Lake George area of Park County. Meetings are at the Lake George Community Center. Information: Joan 719-689-2486 or Help U Club, 1054 High Chateau Road, Florissant, CO 80816.

ITALIAN CLUB If you love family, socializing and culture, then membership in Sons of Italy is right for you. Membership is open to men and women. More information at www.sono�talypp.com.

JOIN US to knit, crochet or craft every Monday 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Bring your projects. Meet new and old friends. Instructions are provided for free. Meeting are at Cripple Creek Co�ee at Aspen Mine Center.

KIWANIS CLUB of Ute Pass/Woodland Park meets at 6:45 a.m. Wednesdays at Denny’s. Call 719-687-5534. Kiwanis is a global organization of volunteers dedicated to changing the world, one child and one community at a time.

THE LADIES of the Veterans of Foreign Wars meets at noon, the second Tuesday of each month at the Woodland Park Public Library. Call 719-687-9157.

LAKE GEORGE Fire Protection District Auxiliary meetings are at 6 p.m. the �rst Tues-

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719.651.5943 [emailprotected]

Top Rank PR-Marketing-Social MediaTrusted. Experienced. Knows our community.

Top Rank PR-Marketing-Social MediaTrusted. Experienced. Knows our community.

3 Ways to Grow Your Business1. Call for a Free Consultation2. Business Community Relations Guide (PeriniAssociates.com/library)3. Subscribe to our Successful Marketing Tips monthly newsletter at PeriniAssociates.com

The Business Buzz features news about the economic scene, promo-tions, acquisitions and expansions. Contact Pat Hill at [emailprotected] or 686-6458.

The Harvest Center hosts its fi rst workshop of 2015 on high-altitude gardening from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Jan.

18 at the Woodland Park library.Arby’s has opened in the former

location of Tabeguache Steakhouse in Woodland Park. In Woodland Park, Andy Benning represents the U.S. Beef Corporation, which owns the Arby’s franchises.

Kelly Wheeler, regional sales

manager, has opened Digital Data-Comm at 743 Gold Hill Place, Suite 129, in Wooodland Park. For informa-tion, call 719-387-5795.

Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument will waive entrance fees Jan.19 in honor of Martin Luther King Day.

The Mountain Top Ex-perience Ride in Teller, Park and Fremont counties was voted #6 Must-Do Rides for 2015 by Active.com. This year’s ride, the fourth annual for the club, is June 20. Mountain Top Cycling Club is a nonpro� t organization founded by Deborah Maresca. Courtesy image

Hair stylist Bo Lindh opened Shear Designs last month in downtown Woodland Park at 220 W. Midland Ave. One of Lindh’s steady customers, Lynn Baxter, dropped in for a haircut during the � rst week of January. Photo by Pat Hill

BUSINESS BUZZ

day of the month at Station No. 1 at the corner of Hwy. 24 and County Road 90.

THE LAKE George Gem and Mineral Club meets the second Saturday of every month at 10 a.m. at the Lake George Community Center. Mineral topics will be discussed but no � eld trips until spring. Call 719-748-3861.

MODA U meets at 1 p.m. at Nuts ‘n Bolts Needleworks, 200 S. Chestnut, Woodland Park. Quilters from novice to professional share their craft and get all the latest info about fabrics and notions. Call 719-687-2272.

THE MOUNTAIN Artists meets from 9-10:30 a.m. the second Saturday of each month at the Ute Pass Cultural Center in Woodland Park. Call 719-687-1374 or visit www.TheMountainArtists.com. The nonpro� t group was estab-lished to promote, encourage and sup-port the making and showing of visual arts in Teller County-Ute Pass area.

MOPS, MOTHERS of Preschool-ers in Woodland Park, meets from 8:45-11:30 a.m two Tuesdays a month, from September to May. All mothers of children pre-birth through kindergarten are invited to join. Meetings include guest speakers, social time and creative activities. Child care is included. Register anytime online at www.utepassmops.org or call 719-687-4812.

MUSIC LESSONS. Guitar, drums and general music lessons are now o� ered on Friday mornings at the Florissant Grange, 2009 County Road 31. Call 719-748-0358.

THE TIMBERLINE Artists meet at 10 a.m. every Wednesday of each month,

upstairs at the Aspen Mine Senior Center in Cripple Creek. Everyone is welcome. Bring your favorite craft or art medium and join a dedicated group.

PARK AND Teller County potluck Just Folks Luncheon is at noon every third Wednesday at Lake George Community Center, 39141 US HWY 24. Call 719-689-0554.

PIKES PEAK Community Club meets starting at 6:30 p.m. with a potluck supper the second Thursday of each month at the Pikes Peak Community Center in Divide. Supper is followed by a business meeting. The public is welcome to attend.

PIKES PEAK Lions Club meets at 6:30 p.m. the second and fourth Thursday in Woodland Park. Call 719-684-3081. The Pikes Peak Lions Club is part of Lions Club International, which is the largest worldwide service organization in the world. Our annual fundraiser is the annual Donkey Basketball Tournament. Our fundraisers and service projects provide support for our local community through work projects ranging from testing preschool age kids eyes for eye disease to sponsoring special needs kids to our local Lions Camp in Woodland Park.

PIKES PEAK Plein Air Painters is a nationally recognized group of regional artists. Join the group for year-round activities, painting on location, social activities pertaining to visual arts and art shows. The group is open to anyone intersted in learning to paint or improv-ing their painting skills. Go to www.thepikespeakpleinairpainters.com, or contact Kenneth Shanika at 303-647-1085 or [emailprotected].

PIKES PEAK Rotary meets at 7 a.m.

Fridays at the Woodland Park Library, south entrance. Rotary is a worldwide organization working on projects rang-ing from polio eradication internation-ally to bell ringing for the Salvation Army locally. Call 719-687-3611.

QUILT MINISTRIES meets between the hours of 9:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. the third Thursday of each month at Ute Pass Cultural Center to make quilts for families that have been burned out of their homes or are in need for some other reason. The quilts are simple, ma-chine pieced and hand-tied and are ex-cellent projects for both new and more experienced quilters. No sewing skills necessary. Participants are encouraged to bring their own sewing machines but machines also will be available onsite. Volunteers who don’t want to sew can still serve as cutters and pressers. This is a nondenominational group. Call 719-687-6828.

QUILTERS ABOVE the Clouds is a quilting guild for all levels. The guild meets from 1-5 p.m. the fourth Friday of the month at Mountain View United Methodist Church in Woodland Park to share quilting experiences and exchange ideas. The group also

participates in projects to bene� t charity organizations.

RAMPART ROCK ‘n’ Jazz Retro Jam-mers (RJs) singers rehearse Saturday afternoons in Woodland Park. Rock, soul, jazz, blues; soprano, alto, tenor, and bass vocalists welcome in addition to keyboard or instrumental ac-companists. Call 686-8228 for directions or visit www.rampartrocknjazz.com.

ROCKY MOUNTAIN Chapter, 1st Cavalry Division Meeting is at 9 a.m. the second Saturday of every month at the Retired Enlisted Association, 834 Emory Circle, Colorado Springs.We area non-political,nonpro� t soldier’s and veteran’s fraternity.Anyone who has been assigned or attached to the 1st Cavalry Division anytime, anywhere, is eligible for membership. Friends of the Cav who have not served with the Division are eligible for Associate membership. We are family orientated so please bring signi� cant other. We participate in local parades, do food shelf, picnics, Christmas party. Come join us for great camaraderie,make new friends, possibly meet old friends from theFirst Team. Contact Paul at 719-687-1169 or Al at 719-689-5778.

SECOND SUNDAY Scribes is for writers, wannabe writers and all those who love the written word. Sponsored by the Cripple Creek Park and Recreation Department the group meets at 2 p.m. the second Sunday of the month at the Bennett Avenue Park and Rec center. Call 719-689-3514.

THE SNOWFLAKE Chapter No. 153 Order of the Eastern Star meets at 7:30 p.m. at 205 Park St. in Woodland Park. Call 719-687-9800.

SOUTH PARK Toastmasters Club meets every Thursday except the � rst Thursday of the month at the Fire Sta-tion in Gu� ey. Social time is at 6:30 p.m. with meetings starting promptly at 7 p.m.Visitors are welcome.Call 719-661-3913 or email [emailprotected].

TELLER COUNTY Knitters meets from 10 a.m. to noon every Saturday. The � rst and third Saturdays are at Nikki’s Knots, 101 Boundary, Woodland Park; and the second and fourth Saturdays are at the Community Partnership o� ce in Divide (located above McGinty’s Wood Oven Pub; parking and entrance on the north side). Yarn fans of all skills and types are welcome for a chance to share projects and conversation. For more details and

plans for � fth Saturdays, check Teller Knitters on Ravelry.com.

THE TELLER County Sport Horse Club meets at 6:30 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month. Call Grace at 719-661-8497 for more information.

TELLER COUNTY Search and Rescue is an all-volunteer, nonpro� t organization whose mission is to locate and rescue lost and missing people in Teller County and the surrounding area. Our general membership meetings are at 7 p.m. the � rst Monday of every month at the Woodland Park Library, downstairs meeting room. Although we are not accepting new members at this time, the public is invited to our meetings. We are available to give hiking safety presentations to schools, churches or local organizations and we do accept donations. For further information, please contact Janet Bennett at 719-306-0826.

THOMAS V. Kelly VFW Post 6051 meets at at 7 p.m. the � rst Wednesday of each month at Veterans Hall, 27637 Hwy 67, Woodland Park, CO 80863, the old Woodland Park Grange Hall where Eric V. Dickson American Legion Post #1980 meets.

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785 Gold Hill PlaceWoodland Park CO/ Above City Market

719-629-8577

Meeting Times:10:30 a.m. Sundays

Hope & Grace MinistriesCowboys for Christ

UN

ITED

C

HURCH OF CHR

IST

TH

AT

THEY M AY ALL B

E ON

E

Church in the Wildwood

United Church of Christ

Adult Sunday School9:00 AM

Worship 10:00 AM

Children’s Sunday SchoolDuring Worship

Nursery CareProvided

684-9427www.church-in-the-wildwood.org

10585 Ute Pass Ave.Green Mountain Falls

Rev. David Shaw, Pastor

Sunday School 9:30 AM

(Both Adults & Children)

Worship 10:30 AM Sunday 7:00pM Tuesday

Children’s Sunday School (During Worship)

Nursery Care provided

UN

ITED

C

HURCH OF CHR

IST

TH

AT

THEY M AY ALL B

E ON

E

Church in the Wildwood

United Church of Christ

Adult Sunday School9:00 AM

Worship 10:00 AM

Children’s Sunday SchoolDuring Worship

Nursery CareProvided

684-9427www.church-in-the-wildwood.org

10585 Ute Pass Ave.Green Mountain Falls

Rev. David Shaw, Pastor

Woodland ParkChurch of Christ

Worship ServiceSunday MorningBible Class 10 am

Worship Service11am

Wednesday BibleClass 7pm

816 Browning Ave. & BurdetteCall: 687-2323 or 687-6311

{ {{ {{ {

Grace Church of Lake George

39141 US HWY 24Lake George, CO 80816Lake George Community Center

719-377-8490

Sunday Worship - 10:00 am

Worship ServicesWednesday 7:00 p.m.

Sundays 8 a.m. & 10:30 a.m.Sunday School 9:15 a.m.

Adult Bible Study 9:15 a.m.

1310 Evergreen Heights Dr.Woodland Park719-687-2303

www.faithteller.orgfaithpreschoolteller.org

SUNDAYWORSHIPSERVICES

9:30am OR 11am

27400 North Hwy 67 • Woodland Park(2.6 miles from Hwy 24 across from Shining Mountain Golf Course)

719.687.3755www.impactchristian.net

THE LIGHTA Spirit Filled Ministry

213 Aspen Garden Way Unit 3Woodland Park, CO 80863

[emailprotected]

SERVICE TIMESSunday Service – 12 pm

Wednesday Night Bible Study 7pm

Highland Bible ChurchMeeting at Tamarac Center

331-4903Sunday School – 8:50 am

Worship – 10:00 amwww.highlandbiblechurch.org

Mountain ViewUnited Methodist Church

1101 Rampart Range RoadWoodland Park • 719 687-3868

Sunday Worship 10:30 am

www.mt-viewumc.org

Please join us in worshipping our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ,

on Sunday, at the

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saintslocated at 785 Apache Trail, Woodland Park, Colorado

at 10 a.m.Phone – (719) 472-4609

www.Mormon.org

Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved

To advertise your place of worship in this section,

call 303-566-4091 or [emailprotected]

Experiencing God’s Radical Love &

Sharing it with OthersEncounter Service

Sundays @ 10:00 a.m.Kids Ministry Available

107 West Henrietta Ave.Woodland Park, CO 80863

(719) 687-7626

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Adult Day Program to open in WP By Pat Hill [emailprotected]

In response to a need in Teller County, Paula Levy is opening DayBreak - An Adult Day Program, next month.

Facilitator for support groups for the Al-zheimer’s Association and board member of Teller Senior Coalition, Levy is known for her work with senior citizens, particu-larly those who suffer dementia.

She frequently speaks to caregivers and other members of the community about Alzheimer’s Disease.

“It became evident that there’s a miss-ing link in respite care for Teller County,” Levy said. “So I started talking out loud to people who might think it’s a good idea.”

The conversations evolved into support expressed by leaders of several organiza-tions, in addition to potential volunteers. “Collaboration is going to make this spe-cial, to have a community that’s going to embrace this program on many different levels.”

As a result of the buy-in, the day pro-gram for people 60 and above will include amenities that enhance quality of life. Among them are outings, exercise, pet therapy, music, art and drama.

Lee Willoughby, co-founder of The Har-vest Center, has offered to help plant a gar-den in the backyard of the facility at 404 N. Hwy 67. As well, Donny Rickert’s Eagle Scouts have volunteered to build raised beds as well as a wheelchair ramp.

“I have angels appearing from all differ-ent walks. It’s been amazing how people are already invested in the idea,” she said. “I think part of it is that everyone knows they’re going to age, that everyone is going to be a caregiver or the person who needs a little bit of help.”

Levy carefully picked the location north of the city center. “It just felt that it would be a good home-like environment for folks to be able to come and be who they are and where they are, functioning-wise,” she said. “We’ll offer baths and showers for the day, hot lunch and activities.”

As a preliminary to opening the facil-

ity, Levy earned certifi cation as a nursing assistant, in addition to qualifi cation to administer medication. Each is a require-ment for potential staff members.

Clients can sign on for a half, or a full day, between 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Mon-day through Friday.

The program, a 501 ©(3) organization, accepts payment through Medicaid or private pay. In collaboration with Pros-pect Home Care & Hospice, the program will offer wellness checks, including blood pressure readings, for caregivers as well as the day-care client. In addition, Levy has arranged to have a mobile dentist come in for a day.

The day care is another step in Levy’s 25-year career in senior care. With a de-gree in leisure science and an emphasis on geriatrics from Pepperdine University, Levy developed activity programs for resi-dents in the Alzheimer’s Unit at Cheyenne Mountain Nursing Home.

In 1990, she became the activities ther-apist at Namaste Alzheimer’s Center in Colorado Springs. From 1997 to 1999, Levy

served as Namaste’s administrator, over-seeing all facility operations.

“That’s where my passion started, with my degree in recreation and fi nding my niche in geriatrics,” she said. “The pro-gram comes out of my past work.”

Mary Barrowman, Prospect’s president and chief executive offi cer, is among the supporters of Levy’s new venture.

“Paula Levy’s passion to provide an Adult Day Program to our region has been an act of dedication to excellence. Her depth of experience motivating people to achieving their highest potential and lead-ership with the local Alzheimer’s Support Group has been a valued gift to our com-munity,” Barrowman said. “The establish-ment of DayBreak to offer a place for so-cial, mental and physical stimulation will enhance the lives of those participating and their caregivers. Prospect is proud to be a part of Daybreak.”

For information, call 331-3640.

Balance classes begin this month Sta� report

The Matter of Balance Program is an eight-week series of classes designed to reduce fear of falling and increase activ-ity levels among older adults who mani-fest this concern. It is appropriate for anyone who has restricted their activities due to this concern and those who desire to increase their balance, strength and

fl exibility as it relates to fall prevention. This program is provided at no charge for adults 60+ years of age through a grant to the YMCA awarded by the Area Agency on Aging. Class size is limited to 14 so regis-tration is required.

This 8-week program will be offered at the Woodland Park Senior Center on Thursday afternoons, 1:30-3:30 pm and runs from Jan. 22 through March 12. For

questions or to register, call Rebecca Janecek at 963-0988.

Moving for Better Balance is an evi-dence-based falls prevention program that uses the principles and movements of Tai Chi in helping older adults improve their balance and increase their confi dence in doing everyday activities without the fear of falling. The program is provided at no charge for adults 60+ years of age through

a grant to the YMCA awarded by the Area Agency on Aging. The program consists of two classes per week for twelve consec-utive weeks. Class size is limited to 25 so registration is required.

This 12-week program will be offered at the Woodland Fitness Center (950 Tamarac Pkwy, WP) from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. Mon. and Wed., beginning Jan. 2. For questions or to register, call Janecek at 963-0988.

LET US CELEBRATE WITH YOUHave a wedding, anniversary, engagement, birth and special occasion coming up? Share it! Colorado Community Media invites you to placean announcement to share your news. Please call 303-566-4100 for package and pricing information. Deadline is 10 a.m. Tuesdays the week preceding the announcement.

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Pikes Peak Courier 19 January 14, 2015

19-Sports

Kemps abound in WP girls’ basketball programHead coach Kris Kemp is coaching two of her daughters this seasonBy Danny [emailprotected]

The Woodland Park girls’ basketball team is enjoying what might be its best start in program history. Much of the cred-it goes to first-year head coach Kris Kemp.

Kemp, who was hired in May, served as the head junior varsity coach last season.

But Kemp is not the only person with that last name to be having an impact on the team. Two of her five daughters - se-nior Katelyn and sophom*ore Abby - are playing for the Panthers.

This is the first time Katelyn has di-rectly played for her mother; at any level or any league.

“I played against my mom when she was coaching at Harrison,” Katelyn said with a smile. “It was weird at first playing for my mom, but she’s always had great basketball knowledge and I knew she would do very well.

“She knows how I play. She’s seen me at my best. She’s seen me at my worst. I trust my mom with whatever she decides to do with me. She knows it’s in my best inter-est.”

Katelyn is a starting guard and is sec-ond on the team in scoring with about 12 points per game. She scored a career-high 20 points in a victory over Northridge on Jan. 6. Katelyn also is averaging a team-leading 6.3 rebounds per game.

Katelyn is aware that there are those in the stands who might think she and her sister are getting preferential treatment because their mother is the head coach.

“I just let my game speak for itself,” Katelyn said. “I’m just going to play my game and hopefully when people see me they realize it’s not because I’m the coach’s daughter; it’s because I can play basket-ball.”

Abby, who is also a guard, has played in eight of nine games off the bench. She

swings down to JV when needed.“I just work hard at practice and show

that I belong,” Abby said. “There’s been talk from some people that say I don’t de-serve to be on varsity, but I don’t let it get to me.”

The Kemp sisters and their mother ar-rived at Woodland Park High School in the fall of 2013. Kris got a job at the school working as a physical education instruc-tor, while Katelyn transferred in from Fountain-Fort Carson. Abby had attended middle school in Fountain before transfer-ring to Woodland Park for her freshman year.

The Kemp family lived in Fountain until last September when they moved to Woodland Park. Due to the Colorado High School Activities Association transfer rule, Katelyn was forced to sit out the first half of her junior year.

The Panthers were just 5-18 last sea-son under head coach David Graf. Katelyn averaged 4.4 points in seven games. Abby was on junior varsity.

“When the players are running lines Abby probably works harder than any player out there,” said Kris, who also has a son. “Both girls work very hard.”

Another daughter of Kris’ is Nikki, an eighth-grader at Woodland Park Middle School and a skilled basketball player in her own right.

Woodland Park won the Roosevelt Tournament earlier this month, defeat-ing Roosevelt, Niwot and Northridge in the process. As far as anyone at Woodland Park knows, it is the first tournament a Woodland Park girls’ basketball team has ever won in the program’s long history.

“I wish we had some hardware to show for it,” joked Kris. “We didn’t get any tro-phy or plaque or anything.”

The Panthers won their Class 4A Metro League opener, 42-39 over Widefield, on Jan. 8 to improve o 7-2 overall. Katelyn scored 10 points, while sophom*ore guard Mackenzie Porter led all scorers with 14.

Porter leads the Panthers in scoring av-erage with more than 15 per game.

Two of the Panthers’ biggest league foes are Canon City and defending state-cham-pion Mesa Ridge. Those teams squared off

on Jan. 8, with Canon City coming out on top 52-44.

Canon City plays a similar style as Woodland Park in that it likes to shoot from outside the key. The Tigers were 8-for-17 from 3-point land in the first half against Mesa Ridge.

Canon City improved to a state-best 10-0 with the victory.

The Grizzlies fell to 4-5 and have lost two in a row. Mesa Ridge dominated the league last year with scores averaging 68-25 on its way to a 28-0 overall record.

Woodland Park will play Canon City and Mesa Ridge twice each in league play. The first Canon City game is Jan. 16 in Canon City.

“We believe we can play with any team,” Katelyn said. “We built up that con-fidence over summer and started believe we can win any game. We can compete with people.

“It boosts our confidence even more

when the games are close. It feels good to know that we can pull through and still work together as a team if we’re down by three points or up.”

Woodland Park hosts Mesa Ridge the first time on Jan. 27.

“These girls believe,” Kris said of her team. “The progression was to get them to believe and then go from good to great. To go from good to great means sacrifice. We have to focus on all the little things and keep getting better as the season goes along.

“Now that the girls have the confidence they need to have the discipline. We have to tighten the screws in practice and we have to stay focused.”

As the season moves along Kris and the rest of her coaching staff is implementing more offense and defensive game plans.

“We are putting more tools in the tool box,” Kris said.

Woodland Park senior Katelyn Kemp, No. 22 in white jersey, goes up for a shot in a Panther’s game with Discovery Canyon. Kemp is the team’s second leading scorer. Photo by Paul Magnuson

First-year Woodland Park girls’ basketball coach Kris Kemp, middle, is �anked by her two daughters who play for her; Katelyn Kemp, left, and Abby Kemp, right. Photo by Danny Summers

SPORTS

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20 Pikes Peak Courier January 14, 2015

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OF GAMESGALLERYc r o s s w o r d • s u d o k u

& w e e k l y h o r o s c o p e

GALLERY OF GAMESc r o s s w o r d • s u d o k u & w e e k l y h o r o s c o p e

SALOME’S STARSFOR THE WEEK OF JAN. 12, 2015

ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr 19) That lower-than-accept-able performance you’re getting from others in your group might be the result of miscommunication. If so, correct it before serious problems arise later on.

TAURUS (Apr 20 to May 20) An unexpected situation could call for a change of plans. If so, you might feel that this is unfair. But it’s best to make the needed ad-justments now. There’ll be time later for rescheduling.

GEMINI (May 21 to Jun 20) The new year brings opportunities you might want to look into. Some might be more interesting than others. But take time to look at all of them before you make any decisions.

CANCER (Jun 21 to Jul 22) It’s a good idea to be careful about expenses until you’ve worked out that pesky financial problem. You might find it advisable to get some solid advice on how to proceed.

LEO (Jul 23 to Aug 22) Romance looms large over the Leonine aspect. Single Lions looking for love should find Cupid very cooperative. Paired Cats can expect a renewed closeness in their relationships.

VIRGO (Aug 23 to Sept 22) Making contact with a former colleague might not be high on your list of priorities. But it could pay off personally as well as professionally. Avoid bringing up any negatives about the past.

LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct 22) A personal relationship could face added stress because of a situation involv-ing someone close to both of you. Be supportive and, above all, try to avoid playing the blame game.

SCORPIO (Oct 23 to Nov 21) You might well find some lingering uncertainties about a decision. If so, take that as a warning that you might not be ready to make that move yet. More study would be in order.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 to Dec 21) Music is a domi-nant theme for Sagittarians right now, and it should remind you to make a greater effort to restore some much-needed harmony in that very special relation-ship.

CAPRICORN (Dec 22 to Jan 19) Although family matters might demand much of the Sea Goat’s atten-tion this week, you’ll want to try to make time to handle those all-important workplace situations as well.

AQUARIUS (Jan 20 to Feb 18) A recurring unre-solved issue might need to be revisited before you can move forward. Consider asking someone familiar with the situation to act as an impartial counselor.

PISCES (Feb 19 to Mar 20) Ignore pressure to make a decision. Keeping your options open is still the wisest course, at least until you’re sure you’ve learned all you need to know about the matter at hand.

BORN THIS WEEK: You’re capable of great loyalty to those around you, which is one reason you can count on devotion from friends and family.

© 2015 King Features Synd., Inc.

Panthers keep pressing forwardWoodland Park boys’ basketball team is 0-9 to begin seasonBy Danny [emailprotected]

It may not be reflected in the win col-umn, but Woodland Park High School boys’ basketball coach John Paul Geniesse insists his team is making improvement in several areas.

“We need to find victories within the game before we can win the big game,” Ge-niesse said. “We are starting to challenge teams every night. As we come together and gain confidence we will have success down the road.”

As of Jan. 9, the Panthers were 0-9, in-cluding a 73-43 loss in their Class 4A Metro League opener to Widefield on Jan. 8. But Geniesse said the final score was not indic-ative of how well his team played.”

“We were down by seven (31-24) at half-time, and it was still a ball game up until the three-minute mark of the third quar-ter,” he said. “Widefield applied pressure and made us make some bad passes.

“The final score doesn’t look real good, but our kids played real hard.”

Geniesse also noted a similar turn of events during the Panthers’ 55-34 loss to Pueblo County on Jan. 6 in the Roughrider Shootout.

“We held Pueblo County to two points in the second quarter and were down by just four points at halftime,” Geniesse said. “Things just got away from us in the sec-ond half.

“Our big thing is turnovers. We have to find a way to correct that.”

The Panthers also played Silver Creek in the Roughrider Shootout, losing 79-24. Sil-ver Creek advanced to the Elite Eight of the 4A state playoffs last season.

“We, as coaches, are starting to figure things out and in time things will get bet-ter,” Geniesse said.

“We’re doing a good job of spreading the

floor and we’re doing a better job of attack-ing the rim. We are putting things together in quarters instead of two-minute spurts. Now we need to finish games.”

Senior forward Sam Hopfe is the offen-sive and defensive leaders in several cat-egories. He leads the teams in scoring (9.4 points per game), rebounds (5.3 per game) and blocked shots (1.2 per game). Against Pueblo County he had a team-leading 13 points, nine rebounds and three blocked shots.

Junior guard Dominik Cunico is second on team in scoring average (6.9), followed by senior Justin Logsdon (4.6).

Juniors Jason Kekich and Dalton LeFe-ver are also playing steady.

“I love these kids,” said Geniesse, who lives in northern Colorado Springs and works as a school counselor at Regis Jesuit High School in Aurora. “We preach three things every day at practice; play defense, being a teammate and practicing hard.

“I tell these guys the Eifel Tower was not built in one day. It’s a process, and we will get there.”

First-year Woodland Park boys’ basketball coach John Paul Geniesse is hoping that his team �nds more success in Class 4A Metro League action. The Panthers began this season 0-8 in non-league games. Photos by Paul Magnuson

Woodland Park junior forward Jason Kekich is averaging 3.1 points per game and 3.4 rebounds per game for the Woodland Park boys’ basketball team.

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Pikes Peak Courier 21 January 14, 2015

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Advertise: 303-566-4100OurColoradoClassifieds.com

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Local Focus. More News.22 newspapers & 24 websites. Connecting YOU to your LOCAL community.

Misc. Notices

Vaccines administered at reduced cost for dogs and cats. A portion of proceeds to benefit Divide Volunteer Fire Dept.

For more info. Call (719) 687-2201Teller Park Veterinary Service

January 10, 2015Saturday, 9am-3pm

*Please note: If you are not a client of Teller Park Vet. and are expecting to have your pet receive a 3 yr. Rabbies vaccine – written proof that your pet is current with the Rabbies vaccine is required.

Plumbing

40 or 50 gallon Water Heater

$895 Installed plus tax

216-3417

ANNOUNCEMENTS

CAREERS

Help Wanted

CITY PLANNERCITY OF WOODLAND PARK Full-time position, open until filled.Application and job description atwww.city-woodlandpark.org andCity Hall, 220 W. South Ave.,

687-5290. EEO/AAE

CNA'sCripple Creek Care Center, TellerCounty's only Long-Term CareNursing facility is looking for

Certified Nurse Aides. We offer acompetitive starting salary of$12.00/hour and pay 95% of

employee health and dental insur-ance premiums . Drug and TBscreen, background check, andpre-employment physical are

required. Please submit applications in person at 700 N "A"Street in Cripple Creek. Call withquestions and/or driving directions719.689.2931. CCCC is an EqualOpportunity Employer.

Laundry attendant needed forclosing shift, Approx. 25-30 hours a

week, Must be customer orientedand have basic laundry skills

Apply in person @ Midland CoinLaundry, 109 West Midland Ave.

Woodland Park

ELEVEN MILE STATE PARKis currently hiring summer positionsfor seasonal ANS Boat Inspectors(shifts vary), Visitor Service

Technicians, Park Rangers andMaintenance Technicians (all 40hrs/wk). Training provided. Visit

http://cpw.state.co.us/placestogo/parks/ElevenMile/Pages/Jobs.aspxor call Eleven Mile State Park at719-748-3401 for more information.

Heritage Tourism Assistant –Part-Time –No Benefits- HeritageTourism attractions in CrippleCreek. $10.23-$13.84 hour, DOE.Weekends required. Open untilfilled. EOE. Full job ad and applica-tion at www.cripplecreekgov.com

Medical Assistant – Medical Assistant, Divide HealthCenter. Join our team and make adifference. Provide direct supportfor healthcare providers in ourFamily Health Center. Apply atwww.peakvista.org/careers

Shopping & Delivery with light foodprep & packaging. Woodland Parkarea. Mature person preferred.Must be honest, organized, reliable.Newer SUV-type 4 x 4 vehicle, cellphone & computer w/scannerneeded. Need somewhat open &flexible schedule. Part time. Mustbe non-smoking; pet-free preferred.Please reply with work history &references to [emailprotected]

Help Wanted

Small rural animal shelter has anopening for a FT fundraising

coordinator. For more details go to www.tcrascolorado.com

Teller County seeks a Mainten-ance Technician I to work in theFacilities Department. StartingSalary: $2,301 per month plus acomplete benefit package. Applica-tions available at the Teller CountyHuman Resource Office, Centenni-al Building, 112 North A Street,C r i p p l e C r e e k , C O o r a twww.co.teller.co.us. Completed ap-plication due by 5:00 pm on Friday,January 16, 2015 at the above ad-dress. EOE

Teller County seeks an Administrat-ive Assistant IV-Financial Supportfor the Sheriff’s Office. This posi-tion is responsible for: payroll andaccounts payable processing; grantoversight; and a variety of clericalduties as needed. H.S. diploma orGED, supplemented with coursesin bookkeeping and business, plusfour years office experience. Asso-ciate Degree in Business is desir-able. Wage: $2,851 per month plusfull benefit package. Sheriff’s Of-fice Applications available at theTeller County Centennial Building,112 North A Street, Cripple Creek,CO or at www.co.teller.co.us .Completed application, resume andcover letter due to Human Re-sources by 12:00 noon, Monday,January 26, 2015 at the above ad-dress. EOE

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For Sale: Propane by Gallon$2.85 cash / $2.95 card

Hitchin' Post Trailer Sales719-748-8333

PETS

Lost and Found

Check the TCRAS website to see ifyour pet has been located @www.tcrascolorado.com.

REAL ESTATE

RENTALS

Apartments

In Woodland Parkremodeled 1400 square feet, 1 bed-room furnished apartment with 2baths, microwave, 1 car garage,cable trash included w/utilities.Short term lease preferred, no pets,no smoking, $650 with deposit 1-361-557-0924

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Near Divide scenic location withlakes and streams

Cabin 2 bed, 2 bath with laundryroom, wood burning fireplace,newly remodeled $1050/mo

Large 5 bedroom 4 bath home fullyremodeled $1950/mo.

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Great ReferencesDarlene 719-375-0183

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Kelley's Cleaning ServiceDetailed Cleaning atReasonable Rates

Residential/Commercial15 years experienceReferences Available

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NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesTo advertise your public notices call 303-566-4100

Public NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic Trustees

Public Notice

NOTICE OF SALE(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2014-0050

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the following de-scribed Deed of Trust:

On October 9, 2014, the undersignedPublic Trustee caused the Notice of Elec-tion and Demand relating to the Deed ofTrust described below to be recorded inthe County of Teller records.

Original Grantor: KELLEY A SMITHOriginal Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELEC-TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS,INC. AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICANMORTGAGE NETWORK, INC.Current Holder of Evidence of Debt:GREEN TREE SERVICING LLCDate of Deed of Trust: 6/2/2006Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 6/5/2006Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.594486Original Principal Amount: $110,210.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 9 9 , 0 9 7 . 8 1

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

The failure to timely make payments asrequired under the Deed of Trust.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.LOT 7 AND 8, BLOCK 33, TOWN OFVICTOR, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATEOF COLORADO

which has the address of:315 South 5th StreetVictor, CO 80860

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofFebruary 11, 2015, at the Teller CountyPublic Trustee’s Office, 101 W. BennettAve., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at pub-lic auction to the highest and best bidderfor cash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

First Publication: 12/17/2014Last Publication: 1/14/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 10/15/2014ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: NICHOLAS H SANTARELLIAttorney Registration #46592JANEWAY LAW FIRM, P.C.9800 S. MERIDIAN BLVD., SUITE 400,ENGLEWOOD, COLORADO 80112Phone: 1 (303) 706-9990Fax: 1 (303) 706-9994Attorney file #: 14-003272

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

Legal Notice No.: 2014-0050First Publication: 12/17/2014Last Publication: 1/14/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF SALE(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2014-0051

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the following de-scribed Deed of Trust:

On October 13, 2014, the undersignedPublic Trustee caused the Notice of Elec-tion and Demand relating to the Deed ofTrust described below to be recorded inthe County of Teller records.

Original Grantor: BRYAN KAHN ANDRHONDA KAHNOriginal Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELEC-TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS,INC., AS NOMINEE FOR COUNTYWIDEHOME LOANS, INC. DBA AMERICA'SWHOLESALE LENDERCurrent Holder of Evidence of Debt:GREEN TREE SERVICING LLCDate of Deed of Trust: 7/30/2007Recording Date of Deed of Trust :8/20/2007Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.609973Original Principal Amount: $203,000.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 2 1 4 , 0 3 3 . 3 0

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

The failure to timely make payments asrequired under the Deed of Trust.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.LOT 21 IN FLORISSANT ESTATES,SUBDIVISION NO. 1, COUNTY OFTELLER, STATE OF COLORADO

which has the address of:179 Mesa DrFlorissant, CO 80816

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofFebruary 11, 2015, at the Teller CountyPublic Trustee’s Office, 101 W. BennettAve., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at pub-lic auction to the highest and best bidderfor cash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

First Publication: 12/17/2014Last Publication: 1/14/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 10/15/2014ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: COURTNEY E WRIGHTAttorney Registration #45482JANEWAY LAW FIRM, P.C.9800 S. MERIDIAN BLVD., SUITE 400,ENGLEWOOD, COLORADO 80112Phone: 1 (303) 706-9990Fax: 1 (303) 706-9994Attorney file #: 14-001815

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

Legal Notice No.: 2014-0051First Publication: 12/17/2014Last Publication: 1/14/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Trustees

Public Notice

NOTICE OF SALE(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2014-0051

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the following de-scribed Deed of Trust:

On October 13, 2014, the undersignedPublic Trustee caused the Notice of Elec-tion and Demand relating to the Deed ofTrust described below to be recorded inthe County of Teller records.

Original Grantor: BRYAN KAHN ANDRHONDA KAHNOriginal Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELEC-TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS,INC., AS NOMINEE FOR COUNTYWIDEHOME LOANS, INC. DBA AMERICA'SWHOLESALE LENDERCurrent Holder of Evidence of Debt:GREEN TREE SERVICING LLCDate of Deed of Trust: 7/30/2007Recording Date of Deed of Trust:8/20/2007Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.609973Original Principal Amount: $203,000.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 2 1 4 , 0 3 3 . 3 0

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

The failure to timely make payments asrequired under the Deed of Trust.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.LOT 21 IN FLORISSANT ESTATES,SUBDIVISION NO. 1, COUNTY OFTELLER, STATE OF COLORADO

which has the address of:179 Mesa DrFlorissant, CO 80816

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofFebruary 11, 2015, at the Teller CountyPublic Trustee’s Office, 101 W. BennettAve., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at pub-lic auction to the highest and best bidderfor cash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

First Publication: 12/17/2014Last Publication: 1/14/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 10/15/2014ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: COURTNEY E WRIGHTAttorney Registration #45482JANEWAY LAW FIRM, P.C.9800 S. MERIDIAN BLVD., SUITE 400,ENGLEWOOD, COLORADO 80112Phone: 1 (303) 706-9990Fax: 1 (303) 706-9994Attorney file #: 14-001815

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

Legal Notice No.: 2014-0051First Publication: 12/17/2014Last Publication: 1/14/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF SALE(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2014-0053

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the following de-scribed Deed of Trust:

On October 28, 2014, the undersignedPublic Trustee caused the Notice of Elec-tion and Demand relating to the Deed ofTrust described below to be recorded inthe County of Teller records.

Original Grantor: HARRISON WILLIAMWELLMAN AND LINDA CATHERINEWELLMANOriginal Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELEC-TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS,INC., ACTING SOLELY AS NOMINEEFOR LENDER, PRIMARY RESIDENTIALMORTGAGE, INC.Current Holder of Evidence of Debt:CITIMORTGAGE, INC.Date of Deed of Trust: 5/22/2009Recording Date of Deed of Trust :5/29/2009Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.626830Original Principal Amount: $236,060.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 2 1 4 , 1 0 1 . 3 1

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

Failure to pay monthly installments dueNote Holder.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.

LOT 26, ROSEWOOD HILLS, COUNTYOF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO.

which has the address of:38 Aspen DriveWoodland Park, CO 80863

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofFebruary 25, 2015, at the Teller CountyPublic Trustee’s Office, 101 W. BennettAve., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at pub-lic auction to the highest and best bidderfor cash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

First Publication: 12/31/2014Last Publication: 1/28/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 10/31/2014ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: JOLENE KAMINSKIAttorney Registration #46144MEDVED DALE DECKER & DEERE, LLC355 UNION BLVD., SUITE 250,LAKEWOOD, COLORADO 80228Phone: (303) 274-0155Fax: 1 (303) 274-0159Attorney file #: 14-049-27235

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

Legal Notice No.: 2014-0053First Publication: 12/31/2014Last Publication: 1/28/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF SALE(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2014-0054

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the following de-scribed Deed of Trust:

On October 28, 2014, the undersignedPublic Trustee caused the Notice of Elec-tion and Demand relating to the Deed ofTrust described below to be recorded inthe County of Teller records.

Original Grantor: ALLEN BROWN ANDLINDA K S BROWNOriginal Beneficiary: WELLS FARGOBANK, N.A.Current Holder of Evidence of Debt:WELLS FARGO BANK, NADate of Deed of Trust: 3/14/2008Recording Date of Deed of Trust :3/25/2008Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.616111Original Principal Amount: $640,000.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 5 9 0 , 2 8 6 . 3 5

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

The failure to timely make payments asrequired under the Deed of Trust.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.

LOT 42, MORNING SUN SOLAR COM-MUNITY FILING NO. 2, COUNTY OFTELLER, STATE OF COLORADO.

which has the address of:725 Sun Valley DriveWoodland Park, CO 80863

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofFebruary 25, 2015, at the Teller CountyPublic Trustee’s Office, 101 W. BennettAve., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at pub-lic auction to the highest and best bidderfor cash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

First Publication: 12/31/2014Last Publication: 1/28/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 10/31/2014ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: COURTNEY E WRIGHTAttorney Registration #45482JANEWAY LAW FIRM, P.C.9800 S. MERIDIAN BLVD., SUITE 400,ENGLEWOOD, COLORADO 80112Phone: 1 (303) 706-9990Fax: 1 (303) 706-9994Attorney file #: 14-003753

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

Legal Notice No.: 2014-0054First Publication: 12/31/2014Last Publication: 1/28/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Trustees

Public Notice

NOTICE OF SALE(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2014-0054

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the following de-scribed Deed of Trust:

On October 28, 2014, the undersignedPublic Trustee caused the Notice of Elec-tion and Demand relating to the Deed ofTrust described below to be recorded inthe County of Teller records.

Original Grantor: ALLEN BROWN ANDLINDA K S BROWNOriginal Beneficiary: WELLS FARGOBANK, N.A.Current Holder of Evidence of Debt:WELLS FARGO BANK, NADate of Deed of Trust: 3/14/2008Recording Date of Deed of Trust:3/25/2008Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.616111Original Principal Amount: $640,000.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 5 9 0 , 2 8 6 . 3 5

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

The failure to timely make payments asrequired under the Deed of Trust.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.

LOT 42, MORNING SUN SOLAR COM-MUNITY FILING NO. 2, COUNTY OFTELLER, STATE OF COLORADO.

which has the address of:725 Sun Valley DriveWoodland Park, CO 80863

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofFebruary 25, 2015, at the Teller CountyPublic Trustee’s Office, 101 W. BennettAve., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at pub-lic auction to the highest and best bidderfor cash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

First Publication: 12/31/2014Last Publication: 1/28/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 10/31/2014ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: COURTNEY E WRIGHTAttorney Registration #45482JANEWAY LAW FIRM, P.C.9800 S. MERIDIAN BLVD., SUITE 400,ENGLEWOOD, COLORADO 80112Phone: 1 (303) 706-9990Fax: 1 (303) 706-9994Attorney file #: 14-003753

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

Legal Notice No.: 2014-0054First Publication: 12/31/2014Last Publication: 1/28/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF SALE(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2014-0055

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the following de-scribed Deed of Trust:

On November 5, 2014, the undersignedPublic Trustee caused the Notice of Elec-tion and Demand relating to the Deed ofTrust described below to be recorded inthe County of Teller records.

Original Grantor: MARK E MICHEL ANDCYNTHIA A MICHELOriginal Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELEC-TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS,INC., ACTING SOLELY AS NOMINEEFOR LENDER, BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.Current Holder of Evidence of Debt:LAKEVIEW LOAN SERVICING, LLCDate of Deed of Trust: 12/18/2009Recording Date of Deed of Trust:12/29/2009Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.632342Original Principal Amount: $157,235.00Outstanding Principal Balance:$142,816.91

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

Failure to pay monthly installments dueNote Holder.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.

All that parcel of Land in Teller County,State of Colorado, being known anddesignated as Lot 35, Rainbow Valley 6AMD and being more fully described asset forth in Reception #558116 dated11/04/2003 and recorded 11/07/2003,Teller County Records, State of Color-ado. Tax/Parcel ID: R0006421

which has the address of:370 OilcreekDivide, CO 80814-7718

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofMarch 4, 2015, at the Teller County Pub-lic Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave.,Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at publicauction to the highest and best bidder forcash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

First Publication: 1/7/2015Last Publication: 2/4/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 11/12/2014ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: JOLENE KAMINSKIAttorney Registration #46144MEDVED DALE DECKER & DEERE, LLC355 UNION BLVD., SUITE 250,LAKEWOOD, COLORADO 80228Phone: (303) 274-0155Fax: (303) 223-7932Attorney file #: 14-944-27454

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

Legal Notice NO.: 2014-0055First Publication: 1/7/2015Last Publication: 2/4/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Trustees Public Notice

NOTICE OF SALE(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2014-0056

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the following de-scribed Deed of Trust:

On November 5, 2014, the undersignedPublic Trustee caused the Notice of Elec-tion and Demand relating to the Deed ofTrust described below to be recorded inthe County of Teller records.

Original Grantor: MARK SNYDEROriginal Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELEC-TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS,INC. AS NOMINEE FOR AMERITRUSTMORTGAGE COMPANYCurrent Holder of Evidence of Debt: LSF8MASTER PARTICIPATION TRUST, BYCALIBER HOME LOANS, INC.Date of Deed of Trust: 6/22/2006Recording Date of Deed of Trust:7/21/2006Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.596089Original Principal Amount: $125,000.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 1 2 2 , 0 4 3 . 4 2

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

Failure to make timely payments requiredunder said Deed of Trust and the Evid-ence of Debt secured thereby.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.

EXHIBIT FOR LEGAL DESCRIPTIONLOT 2, CRIPPLE CREEK MOUNTAINESTATES NO. 8, TELLER COUNTY,COLORADO. BEING THE SAME PROP-ERTY CONVEYED TO DAVID W. ASH-LIN AND MAJA C. ASHLIN FROMDENIS J. GREEN EXECUTED 04/22/94FILED IN INSTRUMENT NO. 419621.AND ALSO, BEING THE SAME PROP-ERTY CONVEYED TO EDWARD E. SI-MON, JR. FROM CONNIE JOINER ASTHE PUBLIC TRUSTEE OF COUNTY OFTELLER EXECUTED 12/21/04 FILED ININSTRUMENT NO. 575113. WHICH HASTHE ADDRESS OF: 115 MID DAYCIRCLE, CRIPPLE CREEK CO 80813

which has the address of:115 Mid Day CircleCripple Creek, CO 80813

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofMarch 4, 2015, at the Teller County Pub-lic Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave.,Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at publicauction to the highest and best bidder forcash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

First Publication: 1/7/2015Last Publication: 2/4/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 11/13/2014ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: ERIN ROBSONAttorney Registration #46557MCCARTHY & HOLTHUS, LLP7700 E ARAPAHOE ROAD, SUITE 150,CENTENNIAL, COLORADO 80112Phone: (619) 685-4800 Fax:Attorney file #: CO-14-629546-JS

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

Legal Notice NO.: 2014-0056First Publication: 1/7/2015Last Publication: 2/4/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Notice To Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE TO CREDITORSEstate of James E. Cushman,

DeceasedCase Number: 14PR30047

All persons or entities having claimsagainst the above-named estate are re-quired to present them to the PersonalRepresentative or to the District Court ofTeller County or El Paso County, Color-ado on or before July 1, 2015 or theclaims may be forever barred.

Lyn Cushman, Personal RepresentativeP.O. Box 2045,Woodland Park, CO 80866

Legal Notice No.: 72517First Publication: December 24, 2014Last Publication: January 14, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE TO CREDITORSEstate of Mildred Mae Forney

aka Mildred M. Forney, DeceasedCase Number 2014PR30063

All persons having claims against theabove-named estate are required topresent them to the Personal Represent-ative or to the District Court of TellerCounty on or before May 26, 2015, or theclaims may be forever barred.

Helen M. IllianPersonal Representative2523 Farragut CircleColorado Springs, CO 80907

Legal Notice No.: 72553First Publication: January 14, 2015Last Publication: January 28, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Government Legals Public Notice

City of Woodland ParkCITY COUNCIL AGENDA

January 15, 2015 * 7:00 PM

6:30 PM – Farewell reception for JohnGomes.

1. CALL TO ORDER.2. ROLL CALL.3. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE.4. CEREMONIES, PRESENTATIONSAND APPOINTMENTS.Larson/Buttery A. Recognition andfarewell of John Gomes’ 27 years servingthe citizens of Woodland Park. (A)Leclercq B. Consider appointments forHistorical Preservation Committee, Boardof Adjustment, Board of Review and KeepWoodland Park Beautiful positions expir-ing 1/1/2015. (A)5. ADDITIONS, DELETIONSOR CORRECTIONS TO AGENDA.(Public comment not necessary.)6. CONSENT CALENDAR:(Public comment may be heard.)Leclercq A. Approve minutes of Decem-ber 4, 2014 Regular Meeting. (A)Leclercq B. Approve November 2014Statement of Expenditures and authorizetheMayor to sign warrants in payment there-of. (A)Alspach C. Approve contract withURS/AECOM for On-Call EngineeringServices for the 2015 year in the amountof $50,000. (A)Alspach D. Approve a contract modifica-tion with Enginuity Engineering Solutionsfor the Alspach continuation of the City-wide Stormwater Master Plan for 2015 inthe amount $149,989. (A)Alspach E. Approve a contract with AyresAssociates, Inc. in the amount of$165,745 to complete the design of ne-cessary improvements to the FountainCreek Channel. (A)Smith F. Approve an agreement withNorton & Smith for City Attorney Services.(A)Smith G. Approve Financial AdvisoryAgreement with First Southwest Com-pany in connection with the aquatic cen-ter bond issue that the Woodland Parkvoters approved in November 2014. (A)7. UNFINISHED BUSINESS:(Public comment may be heard.)A. None8. ORDINANCES ON INITIAL POSTING:(Public comment not necessary.)Wiley A. Consider Ordinance No. 1227authorizing a loan agreement for theWastewater Plant Expansion with the Col-orado Water Resources and Power Devel-opment Authority in the principal amountof $2,000,000 on initial posting and set thePublic Hearing for February 5, 2015. (A)Leclercq B. Consider Ordinance No.1229 declaring the public notification pro-cess and method for the City of Wood-land Park for 2015 on initial posting andset the Public Hearing for February 5,2015. (A)Riley C. Consider Ordinance No. 1230amending Section 18.09.090 F. 2. of theWoodland Park Municipal Code related torescinding the setback requirement on thesale of new or used automobiles, recre-ation vehicles, light trucks, motorcycles,snowmobiles and boats on initial postingand set the Public Hearing for February 5,2015. (L)Buttery D. Consider Ordinance No. 1331authorizing the issuance by the City ofWoodland Park, Colorado, of its, Series2015 Bonds, in an aggregate principalamount not to exceed $10,100,000 for thepurpose of funding the design, acquisition,construction and equipping of an AquaticCenter and related infrastructure and pay-ing costs of issuance for the Series 2015bonds; prescribing the form of said Series2015 Bonds; providing for the sale of saidSeries 2015 bonds; providing for the pay-ment and redemption of said Series 2015Bonds from and out of the City’s GeneralFund and other legally available fund asapproved by vote of the qualified electorsof the City and providing other details andapproving other documents in connectiontherewith on initial posting and set thePublic Hearing for February 5, 2015. (A)9. PUBLIC HEARINGS:(Public comment is appropriate.)A. None10. NEW BUSINESS:(Public comment may be heard.)Schafer A. Presentation of the Com-munity Investment Review Committee Re-port and Recommendation for 2015 fund-ing. (A)Harvey B. Approve Resolution No. 787activating the Council’s Advisory Commit-tee known as the Charter Review Commit-tee, originally established in 2000 for thepurpose of continued review of the City’sHome Rule Charter. (A)Wiley C. Consider Resolution No. 788 es-tablishing the Single Family ResidentialWater Tap Allotment for 2015. (A)11. PUBLIC COMMENT ON ITEMSNOT ON THE AGENDA.12. REPORTS:(Public comment not necessary.)A. Mayor’s Report.B. Council Reports.C. City Attorney’s Report.D. City Manager’s Report:13. COMMENTS ON WRITTENCORRESPONDENCE.(Public comment not necessary.)14. ADJOURNMENT.** Per Resolution No. 90, Series 1982.

(A) Administrative(QJ) Quasi-Judicial(L) Legislative

Legal Notice No.: 72554First Publication: January 14, 2015Last Publication: January 14, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

PUBLIC NOTICE

TELLER COUNTY PLANNINGCOMMISSION

7:00 – 9:00 PM, January 27, 2015City of Woodland Park

Council Chambers220 W South Avenue,Woodland Park, CO

On the above date, the Teller CountyPlanning Commission is hosting a worksession to consider and discuss potentialamendments to the text of the TellerCounty Land Use Regulations related toSpecial Review Uses and Permits, partic-ularly as these regulations relate to resortuses.

Legal Notice No.: 72535First Publication: January 14, 2015Last Publication: January 14, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110256

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofSANDRA D HARTLEY and the propertiesare currently assessed and taxed in thename of SANDRA D HARTLEY.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

SANDRA D HARTLEY

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

PT TR B DOME ROCK RANCH 1 ASDESC AT 426728

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto OCK LLC 401K PLAN FBO KEVINPOOL & LISA WILDEMAN, the presentholder and legal owner thereof, who hathmade request upon the Treasurer of Tell-er County for a deed, and that unless thesame be redeemed on or before May 27,2015, the said County Treasurer will is-sue a Treasurer’s deed therefore to saidcertificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 7th day of January, A.D.2015.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72545First date of Publication: January 14, 2015Second date of Publication: January 21,2015Third and last date of Publication: Janu-ary 28, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Government Legals

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110256

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofSANDRA D HARTLEY and the propertiesare currently assessed and taxed in thename of SANDRA D HARTLEY.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

SANDRA D HARTLEY

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

PT TR B DOME ROCK RANCH 1 ASDESC AT 426728

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto OCK LLC 401K PLAN FBO KEVINPOOL & LISA WILDEMAN, the presentholder and legal owner thereof, who hathmade request upon the Treasurer of Tell-er County for a deed, and that unless thesame be redeemed on or before May 27,2015, the said County Treasurer will is-sue a Treasurer’s deed therefore to saidcertificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 7th day of January, A.D.2015.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72545First date of Publication: January 14, 2015Second date of Publication: January 21,2015Third and last date of Publication: Janu-ary 28, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110608

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofPAUL A & BRENDA VITTORELLI and theproperties are currently assessed andtaxed in the name of PAUL A & BRENDAVITTORELLI.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

PAUL A & BRENDA VITTORELLI

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

21-13-70 NW4SE4

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto OCK LLC 401K PLAN FBO KEVINPOOL & LISA WILDEMAN, the presentholder and legal owner thereof, who hathmade request upon the Treasurer of Tell-er County for a deed, and that unless thesame be redeemed on or before May 27,2015, the said County Treasurer will is-sue a Treasurer’s deed therefore to saidcertificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 7th day of January, A.D.2015.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72546First date of Publication: January 14, 2015Second date of Publication: January 21,2015Third and last date of Publication: Janu-ary 28, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110594

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofIVAR K & HELGA UGI and the propertiesare currently assessed and taxed in thename of IVAR K & HELGA UGI.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

IVAR K & HELGA UGIAXEON INVESTMENTS CORP

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

L104 INDIAN CREEK 15 (INCL MN)

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto OCK LLC 401K PLAN FBO KEVINPOOL & LISA WILDEMAN, the presentholder and legal owner thereof, who hathmade request upon the Treasurer of Tell-er County for a deed, and that unless thesame be redeemed on or before May 27,2015, the said County Treasurer will is-sue a Treasurer’s deed therefore to saidcertificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 7th day of January, A.D.2015.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72548First date of Publication: January 14, 2015Second date of Publication: January 21,2015Third and last date of Publication: Janu-ary 28, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110460

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofPROVIDENCE MINING LLC and the prop-erties are currently assessed and taxed inthe name of PROVIDENCE MINING LLC.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

PROVIDENCE MINING LLCPINNACOL ASSURANCEHOROWITZ BURNETT PCROCKY MOUNTAIN GOLDINNOVATIONS INC

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

7-15-69 9011 PT EMERALD (7.88 AC) +BOND (5.38 AC) EXC PTS IN CON-FLICT W/THE STRAY HORSE + THEBIG MULE MS

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto OCK LLC 401K PLAN FBO KEVINPOOL & LISA WILDEMAN, the presentholder and legal owner thereof, who hathmade request upon the Treasurer of Tell-er County for a deed, and that unless thesame be redeemed on or before May 27,2015, the said County Treasurer will is-sue a Treasurer’s deed therefore to saidcertificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 7th day of January, A.D.2015.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72547First date of Publication: January 14, 2015Second date of Publication: January 21,2015Third and last date of Publication: Janu-ary 28, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Pikes Peak Courier 0114 - [PDF Document] (23)

Pikes Peak Courier 23 January 14, 2015

23

Government Legals Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110460

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofPROVIDENCE MINING LLC and the prop-erties are currently assessed and taxed inthe name of PROVIDENCE MINING LLC.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

PROVIDENCE MINING LLCPINNACOL ASSURANCEHOROWITZ BURNETT PCROCKY MOUNTAIN GOLDINNOVATIONS INC

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

7-15-69 9011 PT EMERALD (7.88 AC) +BOND (5.38 AC) EXC PTS IN CON-FLICT W/THE STRAY HORSE + THEBIG MULE MS

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto OCK LLC 401K PLAN FBO KEVINPOOL & LISA WILDEMAN, the presentholder and legal owner thereof, who hathmade request upon the Treasurer of Tell-er County for a deed, and that unless thesame be redeemed on or before May 27,2015, the said County Treasurer will is-sue a Treasurer’s deed therefore to saidcertificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 7th day of January, A.D.2015.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72547First date of Publication: January 14, 2015Second date of Publication: January 21,2015Third and last date of Publication: Janu-ary 28, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Government Legals

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110460

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofPROVIDENCE MINING LLC and the prop-erties are currently assessed and taxed inthe name of PROVIDENCE MINING LLC.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

PROVIDENCE MINING LLCPINNACOL ASSURANCEHOROWITZ BURNETT PCROCKY MOUNTAIN GOLDINNOVATIONS INC

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

7-15-69 9011 PT EMERALD (7.88 AC) +BOND (5.38 AC) EXC PTS IN CON-FLICT W/THE STRAY HORSE + THEBIG MULE MS

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto OCK LLC 401K PLAN FBO KEVINPOOL & LISA WILDEMAN, the presentholder and legal owner thereof, who hathmade request upon the Treasurer of Tell-er County for a deed, and that unless thesame be redeemed on or before May 27,2015, the said County Treasurer will is-sue a Treasurer’s deed therefore to saidcertificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 7th day of January, A.D.2015.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72547First date of Publication: January 14, 2015Second date of Publication: January 21,2015Third and last date of Publication: Janu-ary 28, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110313

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofWILMA W & TIMOTHY KLINE and theproperties are currently assessed andtaxed in the name of WILMA W &TIMOTHY KLINE.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

WILMA W & TIMOTHY KLINE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

L5 + 6 B25 VICTOR

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto BEAR R WOODWARD, the presentholder and legal owner thereof, who hathmade request upon the Treasurer of Tell-er County for a deed, and that unless thesame be redeemed on or before May 27,2015, the said County Treasurer will is-sue a Treasurer’s deed therefore to saidcertificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 7th day of January, A.D.2015.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72549First date of Publication: January 14, 2015Second date of Publication: January 21,2015Third and last date of Publication: Janu-ary 28, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Government Legals

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110313

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofWILMA W & TIMOTHY KLINE and theproperties are currently assessed andtaxed in the name of WILMA W &TIMOTHY KLINE.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

WILMA W & TIMOTHY KLINE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

L5 + 6 B25 VICTOR

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto BEAR R WOODWARD, the presentholder and legal owner thereof, who hathmade request upon the Treasurer of Tell-er County for a deed, and that unless thesame be redeemed on or before May 27,2015, the said County Treasurer will is-sue a Treasurer’s deed therefore to saidcertificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 7th day of January, A.D.2015.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72549First date of Publication: January 14, 2015Second date of Publication: January 21,2015Third and last date of Publication: Janu-ary 28, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110595

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofUNKNOWN and the properties are cur-rently assessed and taxed in the name ofUNKNOWN.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

ROCKY MOUNTAIN RECREATION INCPYRAMID ENTERPRISESCAPITAL MANAGEMENT CORPCONSOLITDATED CAPITALASSOCIATES LTDJAMES BRUCE KLINE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

L8 + 9 B8 VICTOR

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto FRANCES HEAD, the present holderand legal owner thereof, who hath maderequest upon the Treasurer of TellerCounty for a deed, and that unless thesame be redeemed on or before May 27,2015, the said County Treasurer will is-sue a Treasurer’s deed therefore to saidcertificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 7th day of January, A.D.2015.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72550First date of Publication: January 14, 2015Second date of Publication:January 21, 2015Third and last date of Publication:January 28, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Government Legals

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110595

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofUNKNOWN and the properties are cur-rently assessed and taxed in the name ofUNKNOWN.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

ROCKY MOUNTAIN RECREATION INCPYRAMID ENTERPRISESCAPITAL MANAGEMENT CORPCONSOLITDATED CAPITALASSOCIATES LTDJAMES BRUCE KLINE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

L8 + 9 B8 VICTOR

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto FRANCES HEAD, the present holderand legal owner thereof, who hath maderequest upon the Treasurer of TellerCounty for a deed, and that unless thesame be redeemed on or before May 27,2015, the said County Treasurer will is-sue a Treasurer’s deed therefore to saidcertificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 7th day of January, A.D.2015.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72550First date of Publication: January 14, 2015Second date of Publication:January 21, 2015Third and last date of Publication:January 28, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110321

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofCHARLES W KURIE, JR and the proper-ties are currently assessed and taxed inthe name of CHARLES W KURIE, JR.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

CHARLES W KURIE, JRERNEST C KURIE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

1-13-71 PT SE4NW4 LYING SELY OFHWY 24 (UND 1/2 INT)

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto TOMMY F YOWELL & DAVID AFENOGLIO, the present holders and leg-al owners thereof, who hath made re-quest upon the Treasurer of Teller Countyfor a deed, and that unless the same beredeemed on or before May 27, 2015, thesaid County Treasurer will issue a Treas-urer’s deed therefore to said certificateholder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 7th day of January, A.D.2015.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72551First date of Publication: January 14, 2015Second date of Publication:January 21, 2015Third and last date of Publication:January 28, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Government Legals

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110321

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofCHARLES W KURIE, JR and the proper-ties are currently assessed and taxed inthe name of CHARLES W KURIE, JR.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

CHARLES W KURIE, JRERNEST C KURIE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

1-13-71 PT SE4NW4 LYING SELY OFHWY 24 (UND 1/2 INT)

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto TOMMY F YOWELL & DAVID AFENOGLIO, the present holders and leg-al owners thereof, who hath made re-quest upon the Treasurer of Teller Countyfor a deed, and that unless the same beredeemed on or before May 27, 2015, thesaid County Treasurer will issue a Treas-urer’s deed therefore to said certificateholder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 7th day of January, A.D.2015.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72551First date of Publication: January 14, 2015Second date of Publication:January 21, 2015Third and last date of Publication:January 28, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

BOARD OF COUNTYCOMMISSIONERS

REGULAR MEETING AGENDAThursday, January 22, 2015

TELLER COUNTYCENTENNIAL BUILDING

112 North A Street,Cripple Creek, CO

Commissioners’ Meeting Room

1. 9:15 a.m.: Convene in regular session- Invocation- Pledge of Allegiance- Minutes of Previous Meetings- Accounts Payable- Board Reports- Elected Official’s Report- Administrator’s Report2. 9:25 a.m.: Time reserved for Depart-ment Heads and Public without an ap-pointment.3. 9:35 a.m.: Employee Service Awards4. 9:40 a.m.: Administration: Considerapproval of 2015 – 2018 Community Ser-vices Block Grant [CSBG] Applicationfrom Teller Senior Coalition.5. 9:45 a.m.: CDSD-Building: Consider arecommendation to amend Article XIII ofthe Teller County Building Code.6. 9:55 a.m.: Assessor: Consider Abate-ment #14-009B, #14-009D, #14-009E and#14-009F for Gold Hill Square South, LLC.7. 10:05 a.m.: CDSD-Planning: Considerthe Ute Pass Ambulance District requestto amend its service plan.8. 10:10 a.m.: Cripple Creek & Victor GoldMining Co.: Update on 2014 activities.

Commissioners Business Items:Sheryl Decker,County AdministratorLegal Matters:Chris Brandt, County Attorney

Adjournment

Appointments may vary by 15 minutesearlier or later than scheduled dependingupon cancellations and time required forreview and/or consideration of an agendaitem.

Legal Notice No.: 72552First Publication: January 14, 2015Last Publication: January 14, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Government Legals

Public Notice

BOARD OF COUNTYCOMMISSIONERS

REGULAR MEETING AGENDAThursday, January 22, 2015

TELLER COUNTYCENTENNIAL BUILDING

112 North A Street,Cripple Creek, CO

Commissioners’ Meeting Room

1. 9:15 a.m.: Convene in regular session- Invocation- Pledge of Allegiance- Minutes of Previous Meetings- Accounts Payable- Board Reports- Elected Official’s Report- Administrator’s Report2. 9:25 a.m.: Time reserved for Depart-ment Heads and Public without an ap-pointment.3. 9:35 a.m.: Employee Service Awards4. 9:40 a.m.: Administration: Considerapproval of 2015 – 2018 Community Ser-vices Block Grant [CSBG] Applicationfrom Teller Senior Coalition.5. 9:45 a.m.: CDSD-Building: Consider arecommendation to amend Article XIII ofthe Teller County Building Code.6. 9:55 a.m.: Assessor: Consider Abate-ment #14-009B, #14-009D, #14-009E and#14-009F for Gold Hill Square South, LLC.7. 10:05 a.m.: CDSD-Planning: Considerthe Ute Pass Ambulance District requestto amend its service plan.8. 10:10 a.m.: Cripple Creek & Victor GoldMining Co.: Update on 2014 activities.

Commissioners Business Items:Sheryl Decker,County AdministratorLegal Matters:Chris Brandt, County Attorney

Adjournment

Appointments may vary by 15 minutesearlier or later than scheduled dependingupon cancellations and time required forreview and/or consideration of an agendaitem.

Legal Notice No.: 72552First Publication: January 14, 2015Last Publication: January 14, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Every day, the governmentmakes decisions that can affect yourlife. Whether they are decisions onzoning, taxes, new businesses ormyriad other issues, governmentsplay a big role in your life.

Governments have relied on

newspapers like this one to publishpublic notices since the birth of thenation. Local newspapers remainthe most trusted source of publicnotice information. This newspaperpublishes the information you needto stay involved in your community.

Get Involved!Get Involved!Notices aremeant to be noticed.Read your public notices and get involved!

y g- Aldous Huxleybecause they are ignored.Facts do not cease to exist b

TELLER COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENTDec. 23Johnathan Steven Alm, date of birth

June 8, 1986 of Colorado Springs, was ar-rested on a warrant for failure to appear on an original charge of driving under restraint. Bond $400.

Evan Paul Tate Bond, date of birth June 18, 1996 of Woodland Park, was arrested for possession of drug paraphernalia, unlawful distribution/manufacturing/dis-pensing or sale, possession of a schedule 4, possession of a schedule 2, possession of schedule 2 and possession of schedule 1. Bond set at $2,000. Mr. Bond was also arrested on a warrant for failure to comply on an original charge of contributing to the delinquency of a minor. This was a no bond warrant.

Dec. 24William Joseph Brueche, date of birth

Aug. 30, 1969 of Florissant, was arrested for obstruction of a peace officer. Bond set at $500.

Dec. 26James Wilson O’Connor, date of birth

June 17, 1969 of Colorado Springs, was arrested for driving under the influence of drugs and failure to obey a flashing red light. Bond set at $1,000.

Dec. 27Justin Albert Chapman, date of birth

April 15, 1991 of Colorado Springs, was served and released on the charge of de-fective head lamps and failure to present evidence of insurance.

Dec. 29

Caleb Lee Watson, date of birth Aug. 26, 1993 of Victor, was arrested on a warrant for failure to comply with terms and con-ditions of probation on an original charge of sexual assault on a child. This was a no bond warrant.

Victor Ornelas, date of birth June 15, 1955 of Florissant, was arrested on a war-rant for failure to comply on an original charge of driving under the influence, lane usage violation, driving under the influ-ence and open alcohol container/drink in vehicle. This was a no bond warrant.

Dec. 30 Tyler Scott Morland, date of birth Nov. 23, 1990 of Aurora, was arrested on a warrant for failure to comply on an original charge of criminal mischief. This was a no bond warrant.

Dec. 31Steven L. Schriner, date of birth Nov.

9, 1982 of Woodland Park, was arrested on a warrant for failure to appear on an original charge of pawnbroker (prohibited purchase) and theft. This was a no bond warrant.

Jan. 1Todd Edward Wasserman, date of birth

Aug. 3, 1978 of Woodland Park, was ar-rested for driving under the influence and careless driving. Bond set at $1,000.

Jan. 2Nicholas Alan Perry, date of birth Aug.

13, 1989 of South Fork, was arrested for introduction of contraband in the first degree, vehicular eluding, unlawful use or possession of synthetic cannabinoids or

salvia divinorum, reckless driving, speed limits, exceeded safe speed for conditions, limitations on overtaking on the left, driv-ing on roadways laned for traffic, signals by hand or signal device, when overtaking on the right is permitted and misuse of a wireless telephone. Bond set at $3,000.

Maxwell Maltry, date of birth Jan. 24, 1994 of Woodland Park, was arrested on a warrant for theft and theft of public trans-portation services by fare evasion. Bond set at $300.

Michael Gatt, date of birth May 28, 1949 of Woodland Park, was arrested on a warrant for failure to appear on an origi-nal charge of driving under restraint and turning improperly. Bond set at $400.

James Casey Elgin, date of birth Jan. 30, 1951 of Colorado Springs, was arrested for driving while ability impaired, weaving and speed regulations. Bond set at $800.

James David Jackson, date of birth Dec. 9, 1968 of Divide, was arrested on two warrants; first warrant for failure to ap-pear on an original charge of driving with-out a driver’s license. Bond set at $300. The second warrant for failure to appear on an original charge of no insurance, driving under restraint (alcohol related) and registration violation (fictitious plate). Bond set at $200.

Jan. 4Adam Michael Crowder, date of birth

April 21, 1981 of Cripple Creek, was ar-rested on a warrant for failure to comply on an original charge of third degree as-

sault. Bond set at $1,000.Jan. 5Jessica Emily Patton, date of birth June

23, 1992 of Colorado Springs, was arrested for domestic violence, harassment and third degree assault. Bond set at $3,000.

Eric Thomas Brenckle, date of birth May 21, 1987 of Colorado Springs, was arrested on a warrant for failure to appear on an original charge of no insurance and speeding. Bond set at $400.

Jan. 6Joachim Edwards, date of birth Sept.

15, 1953 of Florissant, was arrested for obstruction of a telephone service and domestic violence. Bond set at $3,000.

Jerry Booth Rhoads, date of birth March 14, 1979 of Colorado Springs, while incarcerated, was served with a warrant for failure to appear on an original charge of careless driving and lane usage viola-tion. Bond set at $100.

Jan. 7David Lee Bowers, date of birth Nov. 6,

1962 of Victor, was arrested on a warrant for failure to appear on an original charge of registration violation (fictitious plate) and failure to display proof of insurance. Bond set at $500.

Barbara Anne Costello, date of birth Jan. 11, 1971 of Woodland Park, was ar-rested on a warrant for child abuse. Bond set at $800.

RECREATION REPORTWoodland Park Parks & Recreation

offers the following programs and sports. Sign up at least a week prior to session starting. Classes may be cancelled due to lack of participants. Call 719-687-5225 or stop by our office at 204 W. South Ave. Online registration and class information available at www.wpparksandrecreation.org.

Babysitters’ Boot CampAmerican Red Cross prepares boys

and girls ages 11-15 with training every parent wants in a babysitter. Babysitters’ boot camp participants will receive a training handbook, emergency reference guide, and a babysitters’ training CD-ROM. Course includes infant and child CPR certification. Bring a snack, lunch and drink. Class is led by instructor Julie

McGuire. The next class is from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 31, and from 1-5 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 1. Cost is $85.

Learn to SwimThe Learn to Swim program follows

criteria set by the American Red Cross. Descriptions of the classes are listed on the city website under Parks and Recre-ation. Please bring a swim suit and towel. Classes are for ages 3-18 years, and are offered on Mondays, Jan. 26, Feb. 2, 9, 23, March 2, 9. Times are 4:30-5 p.m. and 5-5:30 p.m. for guppies; 5-5:30 p.m. for levels 1 and 2; 5:30-6 p.m. for levels 2 and 3; 4:30-5 p.m. for Level 3; and 5:30-6 p.m. for levels 4, 5, 6. Classes take place at Golden Bell Camp swim pool. Led by Connie Knowles and Katy Conlin. Cost is $45, $41 for additional family member.

Family Dog TrainingBuild a life-long, healthy and loving

relationship with your dog through sci-ence based positive training methods. We will use highly motivating reinforcers that ensure compliance as well as fun with learning cues: loose leash walking, focus, wait, come, sit, stay, down and leave it. No dogs at the first class. Instructor is Alice Roszczewski. Training session is from 9-10 a.m. Saturdays, Jan. 31, Feb. 7, 14, 21, 28, March 7. Cost is $150.

Adult Volleyball TournamentAn adult 5 v 5 volleyball tournament

is planned from 2-7 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 25. Players must be 19 years or older to participate. Teams are co-ed, and the registration deadline is Monday, Jan. 5 (cost is $55 per team). The late registra-

tion deadline is Friday, Jan. 16 (fee is $65). Rules and bracket pick-up is Wednesday, Jan. 21.

Start Smart FootballThe Start Smart Development Program

is a proven instructional program that prepares young children ages 3-5 for the world of organized sports without the threat of competition or the fear of getting hurt. Parents work together with their children in a supportive environment to learn all of the basic skills. Instructor is Markaya Aga and parents. Program runs from 6-7 p.m. Mondays and Thursdays, and 10-11 a.m. Saturdays, in February. Register by Friday, Jan. 23; mandatory parent meeting is at 7 p.m. Feb. 2. Cost is $18, plus $26 required kit. Takes place at Gateway Elementary gym.

Pikes Peak Courier 0114 - [PDF Document] (24)

24 Pikes Peak Courier January 14, 2015

24

Your Business and Community Connection www.woodlandparkchamber.com

Chamber Today

to our members who renewed their investment in December!

Thanks Thanks

Bad Rock AutomotiveBentele Orthodontics, PC

Bliss by Arctic SpasCoalition for the Upper South PlatteColdwell Banker 1st Choice - Keehn

Colorado Mountain SpasColorado Springs Convention & Visitors Bureau

Echo PagesFactory Direct Flooring & Cabinets

Home Town GarageManitou Springs Chamber & Visitor Center

Merrill Lynch - John Eden, CFPNuts ‘N Bolts Needleworks

Pam and Liz AppraisalsPeak Realty & Management

Property Management Specialists (Vacation & Long Term Rentals)Stephenie Kaufmann, DDS, PC

Toshiba Business SolutionsWoodland Professional Building, LLC

Your Business and Community Connection www.woodlandparkchamber.com [emailprotected] 719.687.9885 January 2015

Chamber TodayW e l c o m e N e W c h a m b e r m e m b e r s

Tiptop Tree Cultivation719.646.8818

Fire Mit igat ion, Hazard Tree Removal, Clean ups, Grass and

Shrub Trimming or Removal, Tree Pruning, Snow Removal,

Firewood, Chipping, Fence postsOur mission is to bring a

much safer environment to our community and those who

surround. Along the way making colorful Colorado healthier.

t [emailprotected] Scott Donlon, Owner-Operator

Greater Woodland Park Chamber of CommerceCalendar of EventsCalendar of Events

Jan. 20: Membership Breakfast Ute Pass Cultural Center 7:30 - 9:00 a.m. $20 Member / $30 Non Member

Jan. 20: Business After Hours Woodland Professional Building 400 W. Midland Avenue Woodland Park 5:30 - 7:00 p.m.

Feb. 5: Lunch and Learn “E-Commerce Strategies for Exponential Growth” presented by Michael Colab, Colab Digital. Ute Pass Cultural Center 11:30 - 1:00 p.m. $15 Member / $25 Non Member Feb. 10: Partner 101 Class Ute Pass Cultural Center 10:00 a.m. RSVP: woodlandparkchamber.com

Feb. 17: Business After Hours Park State Bank & Trust AT Shining Mountain Golf Club 100 Shining Mountain Lane 5:30 - 7:00 p.m.

Digital Datacomm719.387.5795

Digital DataComm offers solut ions to improve your internal operat ions, enhance your onl ine marketing efforts, and increase

your prof i tabi l i ty. We offer networking, telecommunications, and web solut ions. Our team wil l work with you to ensure that the solut ions we provide are tai lored

to meet your needswww.digital-datacomm.com

Rob Vladimoroff, Owner

Scentennials Products800 Research Dr. #224

Woodland Park719.686.5607

We specialize in fine scented products.

Our line today consists of over 40 Scented Drawer Liners as well as some great Linen Waters with a

global market place.

www.scentennials.comAndrew Gordon, Owner

The Chamber held a Ribbon Cutting for My Sweet Escape Bakery. They are located at 112 S. Elm St. (Gold Hill Square North) and may be reached at 719.687.8000

2015 Calendar of EventsJan 20 Membership Breakfast

Jan 20 Business After Hours at Woodland Professional Building

Feb 17 Business After Hours at Shining Mountain Golf Club by Park State Bank & Trust

Mar 13 Annual Dinner & Silent Auction & Awards at

Cheyenne Mountain Resort

Mar 17 Business After Hours at Keller Williams Client Choice Realty

Apr 9 Spring Business Expo

Apr 21 Business After Hours at Woodland Country Lodge

May 19 Business After Hours at Colorado Wolf and Wildlife Center

Jun 16 Business After Hours at Foxworth Galbraith

July 10 Chamber Golf Tournament

July 21 Business After Hours at The Andersen Building

Aug 18 Business After Hours at Coldwell Banker BuildingSep 15 Business After Hours at Factory Direct Carpet & CabinetsSep 19 & 20 Rocky Mountain OktoberfestPlus

Oct 20 Business After Hours at Fidelity National Title

Nov 5 Fall Business Expo

Nov 18 Business After Hours at Peoples Bank

Dec 15 Business After Hours at Tweeds

Times and Specific Information Go To www.woodlandparkchamber.com

CHAMBER MASQUERADE DINNER

AUCTION AND AWARDS

FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2015

Nominations Now Open for Wagon Boss, Business, Non Profit, Employee and Volunteer of the Year. Nominations may be submitted online at www.woodlandparkchamber.com click on Events and then Yearly Nominations.

CHEYENNE MOUNTAIN RESORT

CCHAMBERC

A Did You Know....in 2014

Chamber Visitor Center Stats

7,662* Visitors

4,294 Phone Inquiries

3.95* Million Website Hits

*19% Increase Combined

Pikes Peak Courier 0114 - [PDF Document] (2024)

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